white and red bulb heat

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by sharol, Jun 24, 2010.

  1. sharol

    sharol Chillin' With My Peeps

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    This is a really stupid question. How does the heat produced from a red bulb compare to that from a white bulb? The red ones are so expensive that I don't want to buy one until I have an idea what wattage will produce the correct temps. I have white bulbs that I can use in a test run. Are they the same?

    Has anyone used the screw in infrared heat bulbs that fit in a standard socket? How do they compare?

    I have 8 chicks coming from MPC in a couple of weeks (July 12 shipment date), and I want everything perfect before they come in. (new, nervous chick mommy).

    20 days and counting.
     
  2. sharol

    sharol Chillin' With My Peeps

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    ANyone? So will I just have to "wing" it?

    Sharol

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  3. Knock Kneed Hen

    Knock Kneed Hen California Dream'in Chickens

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    The heat produced is the same wattage for wattage. The difference is that birds don't see the red light. Therefore it's more calming to them. I started out with a regular white bulb and the birds were fine. After I switched to the red I couldn't believe how quickly they became calmer and they actually went to sleep! The white light stimulates them...not terrible, except that they do need their rest. Also, they can become more agitated with the white light and may start pecking at one another. Remember that the light is not used for light, but for heat. They don't need bright light 24/7 but the do need the heat.

    I purchased a 250 watt light and used a shepherds crook/hook? ( the thing you hang a plant on) to adjust the temp. I raised the light every week in order to lower the temp. in the brooder box. The bulb lasts a long time so I can use it for future chicks or if I have a sick chicken that needs to be kept warm. The red bulbs are VERY hot so be sure you secure the light in two places in case one gives way you have a backup. Things happen and you don't want to burn your house down. Also, you must have a lamp that uses a 250 watt bulb. You generally can buy them where they sell the bulbs.

    I discovered that there's a lot more to raising chicks than I thought. It's been a lot of fun and now my first flock of 3 mos. olds are in their coop/run.
     
  4. gryeyes

    gryeyes Covered in Pet Hair & Feathers

    Well, patience is important when raising chicks. [​IMG]

    I have always used a 250watt infrared bulb, because I have an easy place to hang it so it can be raised as the chicks get older and need less heat. The infrared bulbs produce HEAT, although there is some light emitting, too. (Lousy for taking photographs of the babies in the brooder!) The important thing to know about the infrared lamps is that they do NOT heat the air - they heat what solid objects are in their path. So you can't tell by putting your hand in the brooder and feeling the air.... you have to leave your hand in front of it to feel the heat on your hand.

    So, I watch the chicks to see how they're doing. If they gather under the light close together and peep loudly, I lower it some so they can warm up. Raise it if they're all staying away from the lamp. It's behavior-directed.

    Also, red lamps seem to cut down on the chicks' pecking each other, AND allows them to sleep at night because there's no bright white light on 24/7.

    Hope that helps. I've used the same lamp for six different batches of chicks.
     
  5. Steve_of_sandspoultry

    Steve_of_sandspoultry Overrun With Chickens

    The red bulbs seem to last longer than the white ones that's why I use them. I don't know if it's the bulbs or our local electric.

    Steve
     
    Last edited: Jun 24, 2010
  6. Jenski

    Jenski Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Tractor Supply carries 250W red brooder bulbs that aren't too expensive. It is important to install the bulb in an appropriate lamp, preferably with a ceramic socket and a coated metal brooder lamp reflector with at least an 8" diameter. If you cannot find them at TSC, you can find many kinds of bulbs and lamps at your local Petco, PetSmart, etc. - - just look in the REPTILE section.

    I recommend using a thermometer of some kind, and leaving it out at the very edge of the lamp light so it more accurately reflects the temp.

    I clean my lamps after each season and pack them all away in their own box (along with my thermometers), so I can re-use for next hatching season. It's not a bad investment if you end up using them several times.

    Good luck!
     
    Last edited: Jun 24, 2010
  7. sharol

    sharol Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Great info. Thanks for the response. I'll go with the coated reflector. They will have them at Orschlein's (sp?) next time I get to Topeka.

    Sharol

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