Wry Neck in my Adult Silkie

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by DWilkins, Dec 5, 2018 at 4:58 PM.

  1. DWilkins

    DWilkins Songster

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    My hen is a year old. I believe it's wry neck ( as she has not sustained any head injuries) by reading all the comments in the forum. I am currently giving her "Poultry Boost" Has any one used this before.? It has many vitamins in it including E an Selenium.She wants to eat and is still getting around although with not much grace. She will eat lettuce ,but that has no nutritional value. I have read scrambled eggs are good for them? I only have her and another Silkie hen.Before I got the Poultry Boost ,I broke open some of my Vitamin E tables and fed them to her with a syringe,I am also giving her water in small amounts that way. I looked for Selenium at my feed store, but didn't see it. Would this be sold at a store for human consumption? She definitely has the will to live as tonight after I came home from work,she was out in the run instead of inside the warm coop.I am just heart sick over this. :'(Any suggestions on what I can give her, or help her recover would be greatly appreciated.Thank you so much!
     
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  2. rebrascora

    rebrascora Free Ranging

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    It is easy to overdose selenium, and only a tiny amount is required so you are best to just feed her with a little food that contains selenium rather than give a direct supplement of it. Eggs and tuna I believe are beneficial for this. If the Poultry Boost also contains selenium then I would not give any extra.
    Wry neck is actually a symptom rather than an illness in itself and can be caused by a number of ailments. Vitamin deficiency is one but unlikely in an adult bird unless her diet has been pretty poor. Marek's disease would be more of a concern, especially when she is a silkie, as they are particularly prone to it. The best that you can do is give her the vitamin supplement and good quality nutrition and hope for the best.
     
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  3. DWilkins

    DWilkins Songster

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    Thank you for the reply! I have been feeding them the same scratch grains I have fed all my silkies and have never had any issues.I recently lost another silkie about a month ago that was so tiny.She never seemed to gain weight.I had a rooster that lived to be over 10 years of age with the same diet.I am at a loss.The other hen that I have, has been with Lexi ( the one that is sick) for months and they have always gotten along,but I am now concerned that maybe she gave her a peck on the head since Wry neck is not that common in adults.It came on over night.She stands up,but her head hangs and is cocked to one side but is still able to eat.She is able to hold it up,but not for very long.I did have a hen years ago that had Marerk's disease. All of a sudden one day her legs stopped working.Broke my heart when I had to put her to sleep.
    I gave Lexi some scrambled eggs tonight and she did eat them.I will take your advice and pray for the best.I love Silkies,but they are such a fragile bird.They are my pets and when I lose them it breaks my heart. Thank you again :)
     
  4. rebrascora

    rebrascora Free Ranging

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    Do I understand correctly that you only feed scratch grains and not a formulated feed? If so, then it may well be a vitamin deficiency. Scratch is lacking in many essential nutrients and is also low in protein, Added to that some birds will selectively eat certain components of the scratch and not others ie. pick out their favourite bits, and that can lead to an even greater imbalance.
     
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  5. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Crossing the Road

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    Mareks can remain in one’s flock for years in the dust and dander associated with chickens. Also, other chickens exposed can keep it going by acting as carriers, unless all chicken died before new ones were introduced. So if you had a case before, it may be Mareks again. Selenium is plentiful in cooked egg, tuna, salmon, and many seeds including sunflower.
     
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  6. DWilkins

    DWilkins Songster

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    Oh No!! Really??! The stupid asses at the feed stores in our town have told us that this feed is all they need.I have added things in the water ,but must not be enough.I am sooooo upset! This is my fault for not researching the feed and just taking their word for it.What do you recommend for a good quality feed? I may have to start ordering my feed on line as the stores here do not carry quality feed.Time to chew some butt at the feed stores!! Ugh!!!! :(

    Tried feeding her tuna... she didn't care for it.Sunflower seeds they like .:) I do not know what I would do without this site.I would have given up years ago having Silkies. ♥♥♥

    They do free range in the summer months with worms and other things. With the winter months, the are not getting the protein now...
     
    Last edited: Dec 5, 2018 at 7:22 PM
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  7. rebrascora

    rebrascora Free Ranging

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    Can you post a photo of the feed bag? What is the percentage protein? How do you supply it? Ie open hanging feeder or no spill gravity feeder for them to eat as much as they want or do you throw a measured amount on the ground or ferment it and feed it to them from a pan? With such a feed, it can make a significant difference.
     
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  8. DWilkins

    DWilkins Songster

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    All the other chickens I had before that were exposed have since passed since I have gotten these two.
     
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  9. rebrascora

    rebrascora Free Ranging

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    I'm in the UK so it would be difficult for me to suggest a brand but to be honest I am not convinced that there is much difference between the high end stuff and the basic layer pellets except that with the pellets they are guaranteed to get a balanced diet because it is homogenised and there is no waste. Once you have whole grains, there is a risk of birds being picky and only eating particular grains. Also most compound feeds have added essential amino acids and other nutrients like calcium. These are all bound up together with everything else in the pellets. In a grain mix they are in the form of a powdery fines which is often left in the bottom of the feeder or spilled on the ground.
     
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  10. DWilkins

    DWilkins Songster

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    The feed is in a feeder so they are able to eat when ever they want.I don't have the bag as I have it in air tight container. I will google the feed and get a picture.:)
     
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