Articles from Shadrach

Hens have been laying eggs, sitting on them and and hatching them for centuries without human interference. Considering their ancestors the jungle fowl still manage to maintain a reasonably healthy species population despite the hens nesting on the jungle floor where they may stay for twenty four days or more while they wait for their young to be sufficiently mobile to roost in the trees with the rest of their group. Until comparatively recently the domesticated chicken has survived in...
In the normal course of events free range chickens move around their territory as a group. The focal point of these groups is the senior rooster and the hens keep within earshot of the rooster in order to hear any warning calls he may give. There are occasions when a hen may leave this group. The most common reasons for a hen to leave the group is to lay an egg. I have between five and three separate groups here which I call tribes. Each tribe comprises a senior rooster, four or five hens...
Scientists believe the modern chickens ancestors are jungle fowl. The jungle fowl live in small groups, roost in trees, and nest on the ground. Having watched the chickens here establish similar groups I became interested in finding out what would happen if I facilitated a similar social structure with modern chicken breeds. There have been very few studies of chickens in a similar living conditions and given part of my work here was looking after the chickens this seemed an ideal...
Tar and particular types of clay have been used in the treatment of wounds for many years. In the days of wooden sailing ships during a sea battle a shrapnel injury, or a limb removed by flying debris sometimes got cauterised with a burning taper and had tar slapped over the wound to seal it. Surprisingly many sailors lived to tell the tale if the shock or subsequent infection didn’t kill them. Tar in various forms is still used today to seal wounds in livestock and mud is still used in...
There seems to be no provision for bookmarking content on the profile page, so these are the articles that I have read and liked. This page will get updated as I read more. [URL]https://www.backyardchickens.com/articles/impacted-slow-and-sour-crops-prevention-and-treatments.67194/[/URL] [URL]https://www.backyardchickens.com/articles/egg-binding-symptoms-treatment-and-prevention.66978/reviews[/URL]...
Major. Mel and Treacle after a hawk attack. Mini Minx and chicks. Fat Bird on the computer, my late email reply excuse. Cillin Ruffles Fudge and chicks Block, Tackle and Twine Blue Spot with Punch and Pinch Donk with Knock and Wood Pinch and Punch practicing pro tree hugging Harold and Blue Spot. Pinch and Punch under Blue Spots wings. Ruffles with Mel and Tarn Otic Dink with Donk and Dent
This article is about my foray into the world of fermented feed for chickens. It’s written tongue in cheek and is not meant to be a definitive guide to fermented feed. It’s a bit of fun that I enjoyed writing. I do, I hope, produce some valid criticisms of much of the hype surrounding the health benefits of fermented feed for chickens and provide some advice about changing the chickens diet. The article mainly concentrates on free range chickens. I look after a varying population of mixed...
As humans became ‘civilised’ and water and cleansing agents became widely available, bathing in water became more commonplace and to some extent the purpose of bathing forgotten. We tend to bath out of habit and the primary purpose of bathing is no longer as relevant as it is to other species. Because we now have cloths to protect us from our environment, the condition of our skin with regard to protecting us from our environment, has become of secondary importance. We attire ourselves in...
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