Cochin Thread!!!

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by Settler'sDreamFarm, Jun 7, 2009.

  1. ziL

    ziL Chillin' With My Peeps

    196
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    Oct 9, 2011
    Oswego County, NY
    I'll add my bantam barred cochin pullet, Princess. She's cute, but she got her name for her "Royal Pain" attitude.
    [​IMG]
    I'll be breeding her to frizzles, first a black, then a red. (but the cockerals aren't cochins)
     
  2. wildwoodcochins

    wildwoodcochins Chillin' With My Peeps

    Elinor's chicks :

    Beth G. :

    The dam of this chicken suffers from an immunospressed syndrome. The dam has had a chronic illness somewhere in its breeding line that has caused damage to the melanocytes in her genetic make up. Which means in layman's terms. Her offspring could pop up with irregluar shaped feathering due to her genetics. You can read up on this online I believe.

    I have a friend who went to Cornell for Poulrty Science and has taught me alot over the years on how to cull for breeding. This is one thing he showed me on a bird at a show in RI. I just called him to have him explain it again. He said he would not breed your cochin b/c her genetics will cause the same defects in feather. He's seen this alot in chickens who have contracted Mycoplasma gallisepticum. He said it's a delayed amelanatic (sp) line in the Galla. That's all he could elaborate on b/c he had to go.

    Hope this helps!

    Edited**** ps he said you could call your state tester and have them come out and do a blood test for M.G. That way you can know for sure if you really are curious and want to know. He said M.G. is spread from chicken to the egg.
    Elinor's chicks :

    I only have one cochin in my tiny mixed flock, a pullet that I got from a breeder here on BYC. I bought her as a pet and that's what I got. I don't have any illusions about her quality, I'm just curious. Compared to a lot of the photos I'm seeing here, her feathers are narrow. The feathers I see here - especally on the tail - are much wider. She is nice and round, with the usual cochin fluffy cushion, it's just the individual feathers that are narrow.

    Is that just a flaw? Are wide tail feathers something you all breed for? Or can I expect a change after her first molt? (yes, I'm sure she is a she - she started laying a couple of weeks ago)

    Oh for more room......for more cochins!!

    https://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/uploads/41928_91011_004.jpg


    Oh my gosh!! This is scary! I did google some of the terms you mention, especially Mycoplasma gallisepticum, and I think I understand - my pullet is the product of a disease her dam had at one time? Also, half of her toenails turn up, like pixie toes, instead of curving down. Now I assume that is also a manafestation of the genetic defect? No, I had not planned to breed her, and now I really won't.

    But my girl is otherwise healthy herself, right? [​IMG] She is the picture of health - none of the swollen eyes or respiratory distress that I read about.
    - Is she safe to have, and handle?
    - Safe to have around the other birds?
    - Is it safe to eat her eggs? Those were the things I was not clear about as I read.

    Wow! And to think this came from a casual question about what I thought was a cosmetic problem!!!! Thank you for your information.​

    Okay, so I've tried to find information Mycoplasma gallisepticum. From everything I am finding; this seems to be a bacterial disease, not a gentetic disease. I have raised several chicks from this hen, all have been absolutely beautiful and healthy. All my birds are kept in a clean, healthy enviroment. I work very hard to raise excellent quality birds, have spent a ton of money to make my breeding program as top notch as I can.
    I am questioning as to how it is only the dam that can pass on this disease? Also, nothing I have found on the internet mentions the odd feathering.
    Does anyone else have any ideas on what the problem might be with this hen? I have never seen anything like it and now I feel terrible that I have bred this bird. The hen has always been in perfect health, is perfectly feathered, has had several beautiful babies that have always been normal. All my eggs are incubated, not set under a broody hen.
    I would never sell anyone a chick that I felt was not healthy or abnormal in any way~ Also; I have had the hen since she was just a few months old, she has never been sick in ANY way. She is just a year and a half now.​
     
    Last edited: Oct 20, 2011
  3. thecochincoop

    thecochincoop Chillin' With My Peeps

    Quote:Oh my gosh!! This is scary! I did google some of the terms you mention, especially Mycoplasma gallisepticum, and I think I understand - my pullet is the product of a disease her dam had at one time? Also, half of her toenails turn up, like pixie toes, instead of curving down. Now I assume that is also a manafestation of the genetic defect? No, I had not planned to breed her, and now I really won't.

    But my girl is otherwise healthy herself, right? [​IMG] She is the picture of health - none of the swollen eyes or respiratory distress that I read about.
    - Is she safe to have, and handle?
    - Safe to have around the other birds?
    - Is it safe to eat her eggs? Those were the things I was not clear about as I read.

    Wow! And to think this came from a casual question about what I thought was a problem!!!! Thank you for your information.

    Okay, so I've tried to find information Mycoplasma gallisepticum. From everything I am finding; this seems to be a bacterial disease, not a gentetic disease. I have raised several chicks from this hen, all have been absolutely beautiful and healthy. All my birds are kept in a clean, healthy enviroment. I work very hard to raise excellent quality birds, have spent a ton of money to make my breeding program as top notch as I can.
    I am questioning as to how it is only the dam that can pass on this disease? Also, nothing I have found on the internet mentions the odd feathering.
    Does anyone else have any ideas on what the problem might be with this hen? I have never seen anything like it and now I feel terrible that I have bred this bird. The hen has always been in perfect health, is perfectly feathered, has had several beautiful babies that have always been normal. All my eggs are incubated, not set under a broody hen.
    I would never sell anyone a chick that I felt was not healthy or abnormal in any way~ Also; I have had the hen since she was just a few months old, she has never been sick in ANY way. She is just a year and a half now.

    perhaps it's just a defect in her feathering. I have heard of narrow feathering in cochins and am pretty sure it's a dq, don't hold me to that though it's just something that i was told
     
  4. Beth G.

    Beth G. Gaetano Family Farm

    Bacterial and viral infections can cause damage to the feather follicles and growing cells of the bird. These bacterial and viral infections can be passed from the generation to generation (chicken to the egg) and give the offspring of the infected bird an immunosuppressed syndrome that can cause progressive feather malformation and necrosis. Every bird is affected differently and if the parent stock contracts a bacterial or viral infection such as mycoplasma gallisepticum also known as CRD this can affect the genetic make-up of the offspring. Mycoplasma infections may destroy a cell line walls, which in return also includes feather follicles. Remember that Doctors and Vets use Greek and Latin words/terms when referring to medical science whether in chickens or in humans. The Word Mycoplasma means: mykes (fungus) and plasma (formed). This type of affect is often related to auto-immune disorders in humans. Many people come from different backgrounds of life. I myself have a genetic autoimmune disorder that did not present itself until I contracted Viral Meningitis.
    The only other thing that can cause this type of feather malformation is if the Cochin is not pure and has been crossed with another type of breed which would make it a project bird. Although, highly unlikely since most pullets and hens do not have pointed elongated feathering like the bird in question. Usually it is shorter and rounded more. If the bird in your picture is the dam indeed I can also see pointiness to her feathering also.

    This has been copied and pasted from my friends email to explain it better than I can.

    Like My friend Stu and I stated before the best way to know if this is the cause is to get a blood sample taken from the bird or the parent stock and have it tested.

    Quote:Oh my gosh!! This is scary! I did google some of the terms you mention, especially Mycoplasma gallisepticum, and I think I understand - my pullet is the product of a disease her dam had at one time? Also, half of her toenails turn up, like pixie toes, instead of curving down. Now I assume that is also a manafestation of the genetic defect? No, I had not planned to breed her, and now I really won't.

    But my girl is otherwise healthy herself, right? [​IMG] She is the picture of health - none of the swollen eyes or respiratory distress that I read about.
    - Is she safe to have, and handle?
    - Safe to have around the other birds?
    - Is it safe to eat her eggs? Those were the things I was not clear about as I read.

    Wow! And to think this came from a casual question about what I thought was a cosmetic problem!!!! Thank you for your information.

    Okay, so I've tried to find information Mycoplasma gallisepticum. From everything I am finding; this seems to be a bacterial disease, not a gentetic disease. I have raised several chicks from this hen, all have been absolutely beautiful and healthy. All my birds are kept in a clean, healthy enviroment. I work very hard to raise excellent quality birds, have spent a ton of money to make my breeding program as top notch as I can.
    I am questioning as to how it is only the dam that can pass on this disease? Also, nothing I have found on the internet mentions the odd feathering.
    Does anyone else have any ideas on what the problem might be with this hen? I have never seen anything like it and now I feel terrible that I have bred this bird. The hen has always been in perfect health, is perfectly feathered, has had several beautiful babies that have always been normal. All my eggs are incubated, not set under a broody hen.
    I would never sell anyone a chick that I felt was not healthy or abnormal in any way~ Also; I have had the hen since she was just a few months old, she has never been sick in ANY way. She is just a year and a half now.
     
  5. thecochincoop

    thecochincoop Chillin' With My Peeps

    Beth G. :

    Bacterial and viral infections can cause damage to the feather follicles and growing cells of the bird. These bacterial and viral infections can be passed from the generation to generation (chicken to the egg) and give the offspring of the infected bird an immunosuppressed syndrome that can cause progressive feather malformation and necrosis. Every bird is affected differently and if the parent stock contracts a bacterial or viral infection such as mycoplasma gallisepticum also known as CRD this can affect the genetic make-up of the offspring. Mycoplasma infections may destroy a cell line walls, which in return also includes feather follicles. Remember that Doctors and Vets use Greek and Latin words/terms when referring to medical science whether in chickens or in humans. The Word Mycoplasma means: mykes (fungus) and plasma (formed). This type of affect is often related to auto-immune disorders in humans. Many people come from different backgrounds of life. I myself have a genetic autoimmune disorder that did not present itself until I contracted Viral Meningitis.
    The only other thing that can cause this type of feather malformation is if the Cochin is not pure and has been crossed with another type of breed which would make it a project bird. Although, highly unlikely since most pullets and hens do not have pointed elongated feathering like the bird in question. Usually it is shorter and rounded more. If the bird in your picture is the dam indeed I can also see pointiness to her feathering also.

    This has been copied and pasted from my friends email to explain it better than I can.

    Like My friend Stu and I stated before the best way to know if this is the cause is to get a blood sample taken from the bird or the parent stock and have it tested.

    Quote:Okay, so I've tried to find information Mycoplasma gallisepticum. From everything I am finding; this seems to be a bacterial disease, not a gentetic disease. I have raised several chicks from this hen, all have been absolutely beautiful and healthy. All my birds are kept in a clean, healthy enviroment. I work very hard to raise excellent quality birds, have spent a ton of money to make my breeding program as top notch as I can.
    I am questioning as to how it is only the dam that can pass on this disease? Also, nothing I have found on the internet mentions the odd feathering.
    Does anyone else have any ideas on what the problem might be with this hen? I have never seen anything like it and now I feel terrible that I have bred this bird. The hen has always been in perfect health, is perfectly feathered, has had several beautiful babies that have always been normal. All my eggs are incubated, not set under a broody hen.
    I would never sell anyone a chick that I felt was not healthy or abnormal in any way~ Also; I have had the hen since she was just a few months old, she has never been sick in ANY way. She is just a year and a half now.

    very interesting [​IMG] things that a lot of people think are just genetic defects that crop up being formed from an illness. never thought of it that way but it makes sense. i know that some predisposition to sickness can be genetic. I purchased a bird from a well known breeder and this particular bird was sick a lot with none of my others ever showing a sign. unfortunately this particular bird never got completely better and had to be put down
     
  6. Beth G.

    Beth G. Gaetano Family Farm

    Yeah he is soo good with this stuff. He's not easy to talk to and very um, ecentric if ya know what I mean [​IMG] But, going to a show with him you will learn sooo much! He was brought up on a poultry farm his whole life and went to Cornell and has his Doctrine in Poultry science. Anytime I have an issue I pick up the phone and ask [​IMG] Half the time I am lost with all the big words but, after he explains it to me 3x I get it half of the time. But, going to that particular show he pointed out the DQ in that bird and went to explain it. I'm a hands on kinda gal and to see it made me remember it and always look at feathering after that [​IMG]
    Quote:
    very interesting [​IMG] things that a lot of people think are just genetic defects that crop up being formed from an illness. never thought of it that way but it makes sense. i know that some predisposition to sickness can be genetic. I purchased a bird from a well known breeder and this particular bird was sick a lot with none of my others ever showing a sign. unfortunately this particular bird never got completely better and had to be put down
     
  7. lilcrow

    lilcrow Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,654
    45
    201
    Apr 13, 2009
    New Vienna, Ohio
    Quote:Oh my gosh!! This is scary! I did google some of the terms you mention, especially Mycoplasma gallisepticum, and I think I understand - my pullet is the product of a disease her dam had at one time? Also, half of her toenails turn up, like pixie toes, instead of curving down. Now I assume that is also a manafestation of the genetic defect? No, I had not planned to breed her, and now I really won't.

    But my girl is otherwise healthy herself, right? [​IMG] She is the picture of health - none of the swollen eyes or respiratory distress that I read about.
    - Is she safe to have, and handle?
    - Safe to have around the other birds?
    - Is it safe to eat her eggs? Those were the things I was not clear about as I read.

    Wow! And to think this came from a casual question about what I thought was a cosmetic problem!!!! Thank you for your information.

    Okay, so I've tried to find information Mycoplasma gallisepticum. From everything I am finding; this seems to be a bacterial disease, not a gentetic disease. I have raised several chicks from this hen, all have been absolutely beautiful and healthy. All my birds are kept in a clean, healthy enviroment. I work very hard to raise excellent quality birds, have spent a ton of money to make my breeding program as top notch as I can.
    I am questioning as to how it is only the dam that can pass on this disease? Also, nothing I have found on the internet mentions the odd feathering.
    Does anyone else have any ideas on what the problem might be with this hen? I have never seen anything like it and now I feel terrible that I have bred this bird. The hen has always been in perfect health, is perfectly feathered, has had several beautiful babies that have always been normal. All my eggs are incubated, not set under a broody hen.
    I would never sell anyone a chick that I felt was not healthy or abnormal in any way~ Also; I have had the hen since she was just a few months old, she has never been sick in ANY way. She is just a year and a half now.

    Twyla, please don't feel bad about this, it's not your fault and nothing that you've done deliberately or neglectfully. I find the discussion fascinating mainly because I've had problems with birds that I wondered about in this way, i.e., genetic problems resulting from disease or vise versa. I was the person that ended up putting down the hen that Mandy was talking about. I did everything I knew to do, talked to all of the people I could think to talk to, and this poor hen did nothing but get progressively and increasingly ill. Strangely enough, sick as she was, every time she became sick I expected someone else to fall ill also. I was afraid that even the limited exposure to the flock before I could isolate her might cause another bird to contract what she had, but she never passed her "disease" on to anyone. I know the breeder that Mandy got the bird from and he is a very good breeder, very well respected and I don't hold him "responsible" for selling a sick or poorly bird. She was perfectly fine when Mandy received her and for quite a long time after that, really she didn't begin to get chronic with her illness until she came to live with me, so I did sort of blame myself for a short time. However, my other birds were and are far to healthy for me to hold on to that for any period of time.
    I feel uncomfortable leaving things hanging with you like this, because if I were in your position I would be feeling the same way and experiencing all kinds of self doubt, etc. So again I want to say don't make yourself sick over this, I'm not concerned about selling my birds to you, and I wouldn't hesitate to look to you for a bird if I needed one.
    It would be interesting, if you can find someone to do the testing that Beth's friend is suggesting, to get that done, but if you can't find a place to do it, I wonder if you could draw any conclusions about the problem, by doing some test breedings? Sure would like to hear from Craig and Tom on this, maybe it should have been moved over to the genetics thread.
     
  8. Coopa Cabana

    Coopa Cabana My Coop Runneth Over . . .

    3,236
    42
    231
    Aug 30, 2009
    Colorado
    My Coop
    Quote:Surely the hen the chick was under is the Mom, huh? Or do you think she stole an egg to sit on? Why not just put her in a quiet private place and let her raise the chick?

    I personally don't care for broody raised chicks, they NEVER settle down, and if Gail's set up is anything like mine, even in a "pure" pen with only one variety in it, the egg could still have come from ANY hen that is in that run/pen/coop or whatever. I don't think broodies care what egg they are sitting on as long as they get to set. I've also had hens that I KNOW came in the coop and set with the broody and left her egg right there where the broody could work it in under herself. Kind of like leaving an orphan at the door step.

    There are currently 2 hens sharing the same nest - my Mille Fleur, and one of the F1-BLRs. I think they are sharing duties. When I first saw the chick this morning, the BLR was in the back of the box, the MF in the front, and the chick went back under the Mille Fleur.
    When I came home tonight, the chick was out of the nest box, and out with the older birds, who seemed to be ignoring it. The MF was still in the nest, but the BLR was out with the chick. The BLR went back in the nest box, and the chick went back in the nest box and disappeared under the BLR.

    So, little "BooBoo" (for now!) is either:
    1) Golden Laced x Golden Laced,
    2) Golden Laced x F1 BLR (Golden Laced x Splash), or
    3) Golden Laced x Mille Fleur
    Anybody want to take a guess:
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  9. Mrs. Fluffy Puffy

    Mrs. Fluffy Puffy Fluffy Feather Farm

    15,958
    45
    323
    Jan 26, 2010
    Texas, Panhandle
    Stephanie (fattie) GREAT news!! [​IMG] Remember when you shipped my my Splash and Lavender Cochins? I told you the Lav hen had layed an egg in the shipping box? I asked you if she had been with a rooster, and you told me she'd been with a MF boy for about a week...I highly doubted that the egg would hatch but what the heck I threw it in the incubator anyway! Monday it pipped, and it didn't make any progress by Tuesday afternoon so I helped it. It is doing just fine now. His feet are a 'lil spread out, but he gets around just fine! He reminds me of a mottled Cochin chick. I will try and get some pictures. What do you think it will color out like Stephanie? I'm so excited I could SCREAM!! [​IMG]

    ~Aspen [​IMG]
     
  10. Matt A NC

    Matt A NC Overrun With Chickens

    3,082
    54
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    Feb 22, 2007
    Morganton, NC
    I would bet
    3) Golden Laced x Mille Fleur
     

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