Corid not working

Molly1090

In the Brooder
Aug 5, 2019
11
3
16
I’ve been battling coccidiosis for a while now. My chicks got it and had to be treated twice because it came back. Once they seemed ok they were integrated with the rest and they got it. I gave them all 2 tsp of powder in 5 qts for 8 days, changing water daily. Now a week after stopping I’m finding bloody stool again. Is my powder bad? I had put it in a plastic container. I bought it at the beginning of the summer but seem to remember it being close to expiring. Help!
 

slordaz

hatchaholic
Apr 15, 2015
3,420
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Idaho
I’ve been battling coccidiosis for a while now. My chicks got it and had to be treated twice because it came back. Once they seemed ok they were integrated with the rest and they got it. I gave them all 2 tsp of powder in 5 qts for 8 days, changing water daily. Now a week after stopping I’m finding bloody stool again. Is my powder bad? I had put it in a plastic container. I bought it at the beginning of the summer but seem to remember it being close to expiring. Help!
Use the sever outbreak guidelines, I did 10 days of treatment 5 at the sever outbreak dosage and another 5 at the reduced maintenance dosage and cleared it up. If you removed it from the bag and tossed it theres no way of knowing if it's expired. I tend to leave it in it's package and just put it inside a zip lock bag as I use power, didn't see if you were using the powder or liquid. I would also get sample of fresh stool and have a fecal float test, if they have worms it's going to be harder to get em feeling better. I had worms and coccidosis in the pullets I go that was treated.
 

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Tycine1

Crowing
10 Years
May 26, 2009
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David, Chiriquí, Panama
I don't know how long you've been raising chickens, so I'm just going to put this 'out there'... are you sure it's coccidiosis? Have you had a fecal float test performed to determine if it's worms, this can be performed by any vet if you take the fresh sample in to them? This test will enable you to treat the specific type of parasite, without guessing which medicine will be required to treat it. Are you certain it's not cecal poop (where they shed the lining of their intestinal tract a few times weekly)? Are you able to post some images of their poop? Are there other symptoms besides the poop? Listlessness, droopy posture especially of the wings, frequently 'sleeping' (often while standing) during hours when they should be up and about scratching for a bugs, profound weight loss? Coccidia are present in the soil globally and there are several strains. If these chicks were exposed to one strain in one location and treated... and then moved (say to your place) and exposed to another strain, you could get back-to-back outbreaks in young chicks. It takes time for them to grow resistant to the organism, and even as adults, it can rear it's ugly head if there are other health issues in a bird or your flock.
Since there are many strains of coccidia, I wouldn't jump to the conclusion that the medicine is 'off'. These chicks will need to be supplemented with vitamins (particularly B-vitamins) after a full course of coccidiosis treatment as the amprolium (generic name) tricks coccidia into thinking that it is B-vitamins (food for coccidia) and thus starves the parasite to death. Your chicks also need B-vitamins to thrive, so after their full course of treatment, they need at least a week on vitamin enriched water.
Link is for images of chicken poop, what's normal, what's not... included is an image of cecal poop. https://the-chicken-chick.com/whats-scoop-on-chicken-poop-digestive/
I know I threw a lot of questions out there and things for you to think about, on several of these ideas, but I did this in the interest of saving time. Chicks require immediate attention when sick as they tend to start dying off by the time you realize you have a problem, and as you've stated, you've been battling this for some time now. That you haven't mentioned any dying chicks tells me that there's hope of recovery for them.
Keeping you and your feathered family in my prayers.
 

dawg53

Humble
Premium member
11 Years
Nov 27, 2008
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Glen St Mary, Florida
I’ve been battling coccidiosis for a while now. My chicks got it and had to be treated twice because it came back. Once they seemed ok they were integrated with the rest and they got it. I gave them all 2 tsp of powder in 5 qts for 8 days, changing water daily. Now a week after stopping I’m finding bloody stool again. Is my powder bad? I had put it in a plastic container. I bought it at the beginning of the summer but seem to remember it being close to expiring. Help!
@Molly1090 How old are they?
 

Molly1090

In the Brooder
Aug 5, 2019
11
3
16
The youngest are 12 weeks. It’s definitely blood as the lining tends to be a bit more orange. It’s dark now but I can get more pictures tomorrow. I did worm them about 3 weeks ago as I saw round worms. I used eprinex. The bloody stool goes away while on corid but then comes back after it’s stopped. Either they are somehow getting other strains or it’s just not fighting it off enough during the course. I picked up some fresh corid to try. I have not noticed the listlessness yet this round but have when they were sick before. I had surgery a couple of weeks ago so a vet won’t be an option for a few more weeks.
 

Eggcessive

Enabler
Premium member
8 Years
Apr 3, 2011
49,381
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southern Ohio
Do you know if they drank enough of the medicated Corid water. The usual maximum powder dosage is 1 1/2 tsp per galon or 4 quarts. If they are not drinking enough, you may need to give it orally as well. That dosage is to mix 1 1/2 tsp of powder into 2 ml of water. That is given 0.1 ml per pound twice a day. But if they were drinking well, I would try to get a sulfa antibiotic from your vet after hopefully getting a fecal float on some poops. A good sulfa drug is sulfadimethoxine also called Albon. Bactrim or SMZ-TMP is also good to use.
 

Criticalicious

Crowing
Feb 25, 2017
879
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New Market, VA
The full course for Corid is 10 days, changing the water every 24 hours. It can't hurt to supplement with probiotics to help build up their immunity. I use fermented feed. Cocci tends to thrive in damp environments; if you have a muddy run for example, consider adding brown matter (wood shavings or chips, pine needles, dry leaves, etc.) to help dry it out.
 

Eggcessive

Enabler
Premium member
8 Years
Apr 3, 2011
49,381
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southern Ohio
The full course for Corid is 10 days, changing the water every 24 hours. It can't hurt to supplement with probiotics to help build up their immunity. I use fermented feed. Cocci tends to thrive in damp environments; if you have a muddy run for example, consider adding brown matter (wood shavings or chips, pine needles, dry leaves, etc.) to help dry it out.
I would respectfully disagree. Corid treatment is usually 5-7 days, then if the birds are still showing signs or blood, another round of 5-7 days at 1/3 the dose is given. Here is a good chart:

upload_2019-11-6_17-53-47.jpeg
 
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