Denagard Dosage

RobG7aChattTN

Songster
7 Years
Sep 27, 2013
576
278
201
McDonald, TN (near Chattanooga)
I think I used about 8 loaves of bread, 110 eggs and most of a gallon of milk dosing the Denagard 2X/day for 3 days. I think they would have gladly eaten it with less of this mixture per dose but I didn't want one greedy bird to get it all. I dosed about 8 birds with 2cc of Denagard mixed with a splash of milk and two eggs beaten and then mixed with about 3 slices of bread torn into chicken-bite sized pieces.
 

peahenry

In the Brooder
5 Years
Sep 9, 2014
18
0
22
One person took honey and thinned it with water over heat. Just warmed it up enough to allow it to mix with the water.
Then they added that to the dosage of denagard and the birds drank it. I think she used a 1/4 cup of honey and half cup of water.
That took enough of the bitterness out so they drank it. Helped her birds a lot.
 

sonshine15

Songster
Jun 20, 2015
464
53
146
Our first dosage we used brown sugar. They drank it. Doses afterward caused major issues. Honey, sugar, 100% juice, you name it we've tried it to the point of all the sugar did was cause more harm than good. I sure wish they would come out with an injection form. I don't think there's anything in the way of mixtures we haven't tried, even used oatmeal in the watery mash. They did drink/eat it but didn't get enough to do any good. I gave them only sweetened water, no plain water with the Denegard also.

I've seen posts where others are having similar issues with it. Some seem to do ok, most have problems when doing the once a month dosing...........I have picky chickens for some reason........it does taste horrible. I've tasted it.
 

casportpony

Spreadsheet Queen
BYC Staff
Project Manager
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8 Years
Jun 24, 2012
105,386
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The Golden State
Denagard
00ae.png
12.5% Solution (Tiamulin)


Product information on this website is for Non-U.S. residents only and is provided by Novartis Animal Health Inc. for general purposes only. Many veterinary products listed are available upon prescription only, and not all such products may be available in all countries. The product information is not intended to provide complete medical information. SHOULD YOUR ANIMAL HAVE A MEDICAL CONDITION, PROMPTLY SEE YOUR OWN VETERINARIAN. WE DO NOT OFFER PERSONALIZED MEDICAL DIAGNOSIS OR ANIMAL-SPECIFIC TREATMENT ADVICE. You should always obtain complete medical information about your veterinary product prescription (including their beneficial medical uses and possible adverse effects) by discussing the appropriate use of any veterinary product directly with the prescribing veterinarian.
Veterinary professionals may obtain complete medical information from the product's information leaflet. Information on these products may vary by country. Animal owners and veterinarians should check with local medical resources and regulatory authorities for information appropriate to their country. In addition, current regulations in many countries limit (or even prohibit in some instances) the ability of Novartis Animal Health Inc. to provide information and/or to respond directly to questions regarding its prescription products. Novartis Animal Health Inc., however, will respond to inquiries from and provide information to your qualified health care professional in accordance with local regulations.
Premix
45% WSG
12.5% Solution
Product Type
Oral antibiotic intended for preventive and therapeutic use in pigs and poultry.
Description and Composition
DENAGARD 12.5% Solution is an aqueous solution containing 125 mg tiamulin hydrogen fumarate per ml of product. It is used for medication in drinking water.
Properties
Tiamulin is a bacteriostatic agent, belonging to the group of pleuromutilins and acts at the ribosomal level to inhibit bacterial protein synthesis. It has a wide spectrum of activity but is particularly active against Brachyspira, Lawsonia and Mycoplasma species. Tiamulin belongs to a category of antibiotics which is not used in human medicine.
Indications
Treatment and prevention of Mycoplasma infections (enzootic pneumonia, chronic respiratory disease), pleuropneumonia and porcine respiratory disease complex.
Denagard is particularly indicated for the treatment of swine dysentery (B.hyodysenteriae)
Dosage and Administration
Pigs:

  • Treatment of swine dysentery: 8.8 mg tiamulin hydrogen fumarate / kg bodyweight (equivalent to 10 ml DENAGARD 12.5% Solution per 142 kg bodyweight; inclusion level 0.006% tiamulin) for 3-5 consecutive days
  • Treatment of PRDC (porcine respiratory disease complex): 15 – 20 mg tiamulin hydrogen fumarate / kg bodyweight (inclusion level 0.012% - 0.018% tiamulin) for 5 – 10 consecutive days
  • Treatment of pleuropneumonia: 20 mg tiamulin hydrogen fumarate / kg bodyweight (inclusion level 0.018% tiamulin) for 5 consecutive days
Indications

Tiamulin (concentration in water in %)

Product
(in ml)

Water
(in liters)

Treatment
(in days)
Treatment swine dysentery

0.006

1

2.1

5
Treatment PRDC

0.012 / 0.018

1

1.0 / 0.7

5 - 10
Treatment pleuropneumonia

0.018

1

0.7

5
Chickens:
  • Prevention of chronic respiratory disease (CRD) and air sacculitis: 12.5 mg tiamulin hydrogen fumarate / kg bodyweight
  • Treatment of chronic respiratory disease (CRD) and air sacculitis: 25 mg tiamulin hydrogen fumarate / kg bodyweight
Turkeys:
  • Prevention of infectious sinusitis and air sacculitis: 12.5 mg tiamulin hydrogen fumarate / kg bodyweight
  • Treatment of infectious sinusitis and air sacculitis: 25 mg tiamulin hydrogen fumarate / kg bodyweight

Indications

Tiamulin (concentration in water in %)

Product
(in ml)

Water
(in liters)

Treatment
(in days)
Prevention CRD / air sacculitis / infectious sinusitis

0.0125

1

1

3 days (1stweek of life); 1-2 days every 3-4 weeks
Treatment CRD / air sacculitis / infectious sinusitis

0.025

2

1

3 – 5
Withdrawal Periods
Withdrawal periods according to national registrations.
Special Precautions and Warnings
Do not administer ionophore anticoccidials (salinomycin, monensin, narasin) to pigs and poultry receiving therapeutic doses of DENAGARD. Pigs and poultry should not receive products containing ionophores during or for at least seven days before or after treatment with DENAGARD.
Formulations and Packages
DENAGARD 12.5% Solution
  • 1 litre dispensing packs
 

sonshine15

Songster
Jun 20, 2015
464
53
146
There are published doses for once daily oral dosing.  However, there are several people who have posted that this medication is quite irritating if not diluted, so I would be reluctant to give it all in one single daily dose.  I would probably divide it into 3 separate doses, and mix each dose into a full tube-feeding meal.  That should dilute it out enough to not be irritating to the crop.  It would be essential to mix it in thoroughly.  You'd be using a very small volume of liquid, and you don't want it improperly mixed, and possibly the tiny volume of necessary medication stuck to the wall of the tube, or retained in the tube as you remove it.

One of the oral doses specific for "adult poultry" is 30 mg/kg per day for 7 days.  So if you're tube feeding, you could mix 10 mg/kg into 3 different tube feedings per day, which would bring your total daily dose to 30 mg/kg.. 

To figure out how much to use, weigh the bird first.  Most people in the U.S. will weigh in pounds.  Convert the weight to kg.

Pounds divided by 2.2 = kg  (Examples:  5 pounds divided by 2.2 = 2.27 kg.   One pound divided by 2.2 = 0.454 kg)

Second, determine how many mg of medicine you need by multiplying the dosage for each feeding (10 mg/kg) by the kg weight of the bird
(Examples:   10 mg/kg X 2.27 kg = 22.7 mg                 10 mg/kg X 0.454 kg = 4.54 mg)

Third, determine how many ml you need by dividing the number of mg by the concentration of the medicine (Denagard is 12.5%, which is 125 mg/ml).  (Examples:  22.7 mg divided by 125 mg/ml = 0.18 ml          4.54 mg divided by 125 mg/ml = 0.036 ml)

So, if you're using the dose of 30 mg/kg/day and you divide it up into 3 separate feedings, the dose per feeding for various weights would be:

3 lbs divided by 2.2 lbs/kg = 1.36 kg X 10 mg/kg = 13.6 mg divided by 125 mg/ml = 0.11 ml
4 lbs divided by 2.2 lbs/kg = 1.82 kg X 10 mg/kg = 18.2 mg divided by 125 mg/ml = 0.15 ml
5 lbs divided by 2.2 lbs/kg = 2.27 kg X 10 mg/kg = 22.7 mg divided by 125 mg/ml = 0.18 ml
6 lbs divided by 2.2 lbs/kg = 2.73 kg X 10 mg/kg = 27.3 mg divided by 125 mg/ml = 0.22 ml
7 lbs divided by 2.2 lbs/kg = 3.18 kg X 10 mg/kg = 31.8 mg divided by 125 mg/ml = 0.25 ml
8 lbs divided by 2.2 lbs/kg = 3.64 kg X 10 mg/kg = 36.4 mg divided by 125 mg/ml = 0.29 ml
9 lbs divided by 2.2 lbs/kg = 4.09 kg X 10 mg/kg = 40.9 mg divided by 125 mg/ml = 0.33 ml
Etc, etc, with the final dose in ml mixed thoroughly with the tube feeding slurry


There are several other published doses for direct oral use, varying between 25-50 mg/kg.  To use a different dose, simply chose the dose you want, divide it by the 3 feedings, and substitute that dose into the equation instead of the 10 mg/kg in the above examples.  For instance, if you wanted to use a maximum daily dose of 50 mg/kg, and you had a 7 pound bird:

50 mg/kg/day divided by 3 feedings per day = 16.67 mg/kg

7 lbs divided by 2.2 lbs/kg = 3.18 kg X 16.67 mg/kg = 53.0 mg divided by 125 mg/ml = 0.42 ml, mixed thoroughly into tube feeding slurry

(For those of you who use a calculator and get a very slightly different result, that is because I've done each step separately for instructional purposes, and have rounded off each number in each step separately to the nearest tenth or hundredth place.  A calculator won't do that for you.  So if you do the equations all in a line with a calculator that reads out 6 digits after the decimal place, you may end up with a final ml that is a few hundredth off my calculations.  Not a big deal, as you aren't going to be measuring to that level of accuracy anyway.)

If math is overwhelming for you, just use a calculator and take it one step at a time, referring to the examples so that you know that you're doing each step properly.  Be sure that your final ml dose comes out in the right ballpark.  That's the most important thing.  If you're a few hundredths of a ml off in your calculation, no big deal.  If you're 10 or 100 times off in your calculations, then you could have a serious overdose.


Ohhhhh wow.....I started day one/tube feeding and just saw the 7 days.....rofl......it took a very long time starting just 9 of them today. Oh wow/ holdin onto my noggin for a rough week....these girls better start drinking and eating the stuff on their own/again by next month. Maybe they're smarter than we give them credit and will choose to not be so picky over being tubed.....when pigs fly lol
 

Sydney Acres

Songster
Jun 24, 2012
1,410
491
231
Western WA
Ohhhhh wow.....I started day one/tube feeding and just saw the 7 days.....rofl......it took a very long time starting just 9 of them today. Oh wow/ holdin onto my noggin for a rough week....these girls better start drinking and eating the stuff on their own/again by next month. Maybe they're smarter than we give them credit and will choose to not be so picky over being tubed.....when pigs fly lol
There are many different doses. The 7 day protocol is the longest one, and the one that specifically states "adult poultry." There are many protocols that recommend 3-5 days. Since you're tube feeding them, and you know 100% that they are getting 100% of the dose, you might do fine with a 3-5 day duration.
 

sonshine15

Songster
Jun 20, 2015
464
53
146
There are many different doses. The 7 day protocol is the longest one, and the one that specifically states "adult poultry." There are many protocols that recommend 3-5 days. Since you're tube feeding them, and you know 100% that they are getting 100% of the dose, you might do fine with a 3-5 day duration.

You just made my day! I can do 5 but the 7 was really daunting..........5 days will give me a chance to at least do my dishes once
lau.gif

Ok, here's my confession of getting overwhelmed trying to figure out why the flock has been so different with symptoms this time, including sending to lab etc..........I totally forgot I had a hatch in the bator until a couple weeks went by...........this confession coming from a person who hovers over the bators and it's out of sight, out of mind.....lockdown is today..........they'll be kept 100% isolated from the coops. (one reason I forgot about them) What's odd is the temps all stayed normal all this time. I only checked them twice..........very recently ROFL. Now, had I been hovering that would not have happened. I put them in before all my flock got so sick, and just had a senior moment and then some....................had I remembered the bator would have been turned off asap.

I'm going to try heating the eggs and tektrol next hatch/keeping them out of coop area too with oxine as mist as usual. BUT has anyone else tried anything else with success in the horizontal (hope that's the right one) transmission of MS to chicks?
 

Sydney Acres

Songster
Jun 24, 2012
1,410
491
231
Western WA
Quote: There's a fairly old way of treating eggs with medication before putting them into the incubator. You'll have to search for the details, as I don't remember them and don't remember where I read it. It involved intentionally washing off the bloom, then using temperature changes so that the medication would be pulled in through the egg shell. I think that the eggs were dipped in cooled liquid medication, but honestly don't remember. Kind of the opposite principle as always washing eggs in water warmer than the egg to prevent the egg from pulling contamination in through the shell. This is washing the eggs in water slightly warmer than the eggs to remove any contamination, then placing them in cooler liquid medication to intentionally have them absorb it. The protocol had specific times and temps and meds for specific diseases, none of which I remember, but you might be able to find details if you search for something like "egg dip" or "medicated egg dip" or "how to disinfect hatching eggs."
 

casportpony

Spreadsheet Queen
BYC Staff
Project Manager
Premium Feather Member
8 Years
Jun 24, 2012
105,386
276,357
2,052
The Golden State
Quote: There's a fairly old way of treating eggs with medication before putting them into the incubator. You'll have to search for the details, as I don't remember them and don't remember where I read it. It involved intentionally washing off the bloom, then using temperature changes so that the medication would be pulled in through the egg shell. I think that the eggs were dipped in cooled liquid medication, but honestly don't remember. Kind of the opposite principle as always washing eggs in water warmer than the egg to prevent the egg from pulling contamination in through the shell. This is washing the eggs in water slightly warmer than the eggs to remove any contamination, then placing them in cooler liquid medication to intentionally have them absorb it. The protocol had specific times and temps and meds for specific diseases, none of which I remember, but you might be able to find details if you search for something like "egg dip" or "medicated egg dip" or "how to disinfect hatching eggs."
I think that one of Sally Sunshine's hatching threads has some of this info.

-Kathy
 

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