Dying bantam hen

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by TXchickmum, Apr 10, 2017.

  1. TXchickmum

    TXchickmum Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 21, 2012
    North Texas
    I have a 6-year-old Japanese bantam hen that has been progressively declining over the past few weeks. Her comb and wattles became pale, her skin began yellowing, and now she has developed a very rock-like crop. Her crop isn't swollen or large, but it is very hard (and not much is passing). She is not eating unless hand fed. She will no longer drink water, either. -very lethargic. Is this potentially just age-related?? All of our other birds are healthy and thriving. -no sneezing, discharge, or any other symptoms.
     
  2. EggSighted4Life

    EggSighted4Life Overrun With Chickens

    Hi, are you sure it isn't an impacted crop?
     
  3. EggSighted4Life

    EggSighted4Life Overrun With Chickens

    What I mean is I'm sorry your girl isn't doing well. [​IMG]

    It does sound like it could be age related. Prior to the recent decline, was she laying for you?

    What are you feeding including treats and supplements?
     
  4. TXchickmum

    TXchickmum Chillin' With My Peeps

    2,725
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    Apr 21, 2012
    North Texas
    She hasn't laid any eggs since early fall. (has done this for the last two years, though. -usually starts back in the spring/summer)
    I do not give any supplements (other than electrolyte powder, specifically for poultry, in water during our very hot summers).
    She is eating a layer crumble feed. Nature Wise layer crumbles. (we cannot get the NatureSmart organic crumbles in our area any longer :-( ) I do make oyster grit available, and they only seem to eat this as needed.
    We grow greens in our garden (all organic), as well as blueberries and blackberries. The chickens forage on the lawn several times per day, and are given a small amount of fresh greens and berries. They pretty much jump up and pick the berries they want, then move on.
     
    Last edited: Apr 10, 2017
  5. TXchickmum

    TXchickmum Chillin' With My Peeps

    2,725
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    Apr 21, 2012
    North Texas
    I wondered if it was an impacted crop. Her crop isn't very big, but it isn't emptying overnight.
     
  6. EggSighted4Life

    EggSighted4Life Overrun With Chickens

    Sounds pretty good.

    Some people switch to a non layer feed when chickens are in the off season and put the OS on the side for the girls who are still laying. Reason is that too much calcium in non layers including those on molt, brooding, growing, and cockerels... can (doesn't mean will) cause kidney issues in the long term. Many who feed layer forever will never know if they lost any birds for this reason as they often don't get necropsies.

    I would make sure your girl gets the electrolytes and preferably some vitamins as well. And I would give scrambled or boiled, chopped egg... because they are super easy to digest and loaded with nutrients and micro nutrient.

    If she really quits eating I would humanely help her out of her discomfort. Chickens being prey animals will do their very best not to show any signs of weakness so the don't get shunned among their own group or look like an easy meal. So by the time they actually show, it's means they really need help.

    Sorry I can't be more help.
     
  7. TXchickmum

    TXchickmum Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 21, 2012
    North Texas
    Thank you. -just wanted to get feedback with those with experience. (We carried a 2-yr-old bantam to the vet a few years ago, spent $1200, found out it was ovarian cancer, and lost her.) I do not want my birds to ever suffer.....but cannot fathom spending that type of $ again. I will get some vitamins, and give the scrambled eggs, and humanely euthanize if there is no progress.
     
  8. EggSighted4Life

    EggSighted4Life Overrun With Chickens

    A lot of people use Poly Vi Sol baby vitamins with NO iron. It has the B's in it which are a huge support. I have used regular bird vitamins. If you have access to a product called Poultry Nutridrench, I would definitely try it. Heard good things. I see you are in the US, so it should be available at feed stores.

    The majority of older hens do die from reproductive issues.

    I also would not be able to spend that kind of $. With so many animals we often become our own vets when possible.

    Also, I have zero experience with impacted crop, if that is it.
     
  9. TXchickmum

    TXchickmum Chillin' With My Peeps

    2,725
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    Apr 21, 2012
    North Texas
    -decided to do surgery for an impacted crop (after much reading). -pulled out a lot of tangled mess. She is doing surprisingly well, at present. -with vitamin support, a clean and quiet environment (indoors for now), and a very small bit of yogurt......she is really alert and much different from earlier in the day. Time will tell. If there was a blockage in the crop, she may very well recover. If there is blockage/issues further into the digestive tract/reproductive system, then this won't help much. -worth a try, though!
     
  10. EggSighted4Life

    EggSighted4Life Overrun With Chickens

    So you did surgery yourself?! You go! [​IMG]

    Sounds like she may recover nicely. [​IMG]

    Either way... you did your best and were very vigilant! [​IMG]

    Look forward to a great update, with pics, [​IMG]
     

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