dying hen- help!

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by ChickenMorals, Nov 27, 2017.

Tags:
  1. ChickenMorals

    ChickenMorals In the Brooder

    23
    36
    44
    Sep 11, 2017
    St. Paul
    I made a post a while ago about a hen with a nearly purple comb and drooling. Over break, she seemed to be getting better, now she has a pure white comb that is dribbling blood, she cant stand, and she weighs almost nothing. She is refusing to eat or drink, but it isn't sour crop. Her whole face is pale, and her eyes are constantly fluttering shut. She is still drooling. She has a vet appointment today, but we might have to put her down. Any ideas on what this is?? This is my first experience with a sick chicken. Please reply ASAP, I'm quite worried.
     
  2. Wyorp Rock

    Wyorp Rock Enabler

    20,036
    21,020
    1,052
    Sep 20, 2015
    Southern N.C. Mountains
    :hugs I'm sorry she is not doing well.

    Do you mean that her comb is bleeding? Is she injured?

    I'm glad you have a vet appointment for today, hopefully they will be able to determine what is wrong with her. It is hard, but sometimes chickens get so sick, the only kind thing you can do is put them down - I hope this is not the case, but if it is, then know that you tried to help her.

    With the symptoms you describe and looking back quickly at your other posts, these are the chickens that are at your school? It's hard to know what's going on with her. The only thing I can suggest is to place her in a box or crate on some clean, dry bedding or on some old towels. Make her as comfortable as you can, keep the place she is being kept fairly quiet and calm. Make water available.
    Please let us know what you find out at the vet. I'm sorry I wish I had better answers.
     
    Wickedchicken6 and micstrachan like this.
  3. ChickenMorals

    ChickenMorals In the Brooder

    23
    36
    44
    Sep 11, 2017
    St. Paul
    I went out to check on her and blood was running down her face. I couldn't really find a noticeable mark on her comb, but it was coming from the comb. I don't know if she was pecked by another chicken or what, but it's bleeding.
    They are the chickens at my school. I can't do much except take her to the vet and pay out of pocket.
     
  4. Wyorp Rock

    Wyorp Rock Enabler

    20,036
    21,020
    1,052
    Sep 20, 2015
    Southern N.C. Mountains
    If she is actively bleeding, then you need to separate her. Once the other chickens start pecking and draw blood, they can hurt her.

    Can you place her away from the others in a box or crate so she can rest and not worry about being pecked?
     
  5. rebrascora

    rebrascora Free Ranging

    7,040
    8,390
    536
    Feb 14, 2014
    Consett Co.Durham. UK
    She will also benefit from a heat source.... sick, skinny chickens that are not eating have no way of maintaining their body temperature. If you don't have a heating pad or lamp, a couple of soda bottles filled with hot water and placed in a box with a towel on top and the chicken on top of the towel will help make her more comfortable. The blood is almost certainly from the other chickens pecking at her comb, which they will do to a sick chicken to chase them away from the flock.... it is a natural defence mechanism to prevent them spreading sickness to the other flock members. Unfortunately when chickens are penned the sick bird is unable to get away from them and the pecking can become quite brutal.
    I hope you are able to save her but if not, the next best thing is to put an end to her suffering.
    Good luck.
     
    micstrachan likes this.
  6. ChickenMorals

    ChickenMorals In the Brooder

    23
    36
    44
    Sep 11, 2017
    St. Paul
    She had to be put down. They did a necropsy and found 15 cm of something (compressed plant fibers or plastic) balled up in her crop. They also found her crop was rotting from the inside out, and her intestines were full of thick grey fluid. They're not sure if the bacterial crop infection or the goop in her intestines is contagious, they're testing that today.
     
  7. micstrachan

    micstrachan Free Ranging

    Aaww... I’m so sorry.
     
  8. rebrascora

    rebrascora Free Ranging

    7,040
    8,390
    536
    Feb 14, 2014
    Consett Co.Durham. UK
    I'm so sorry, but at least she is no longer suffering. :hugsIt is good that they opened her up to have a look inside and figure out what the problem was. I've had hens with compacted fibrous plant material like that blocking the crop. Sometimes you can break it up with massage if you catch it early enough but others you need to physically remove it. My pekins (bantam cochins) seem to be particularly susceptible to it. I had to do surgery to remove it a great ball of it twice from one chicken. Sadly I didn't spot it soon enough the second time and she was too weak to recover. She was a lovely little soul but clearly had a bit of a death wish as she seemed to compulsively eat straw and hay the minute she had the opportunity :barnie

    It sounds like your vet is being really thorough which is good. So often we read of people taking their chicken to the vet and getting poor service, it is refreshing to hear of one that is taking an interest. Can you update this post with the results of the further tests so that we can perhaps all learn something from your little girl's death.

    Best wishes

    Barbara
     
    Duckworth likes this.
  9. Hen Power

    Hen Power In the Brooder

    13
    4
    21
    May 21, 2017
    Just as when a child or family member is ill and we don't know what to do, a professional should be consulted. With respect to you, your hen has been suffering from some serious problem for some time and should have been seen by a vet before it got this far. I am happy you are taking her in, and good luck to you.
     
  10. rebrascora

    rebrascora Free Ranging

    7,040
    8,390
    536
    Feb 14, 2014
    Consett Co.Durham. UK
    @Hen Power

    I find your post offensive, particularly as you didn't bother to read the most recent update from the OP to see that her hen had to be put down. Your comment is callous and insensitive.
    Many of us do not have the means to take every sick chicken we have to the vets. Instead we spend time researching and learning all we can about chicken illnesses and treatments. Many vets know nothing at all about chickens. I would rather put my faith in my own learning and the experienced and compassionate people here on BYC who generously share their time and knowledge for nothing other than the hope of helping a chicken and chicken owner in need..... somewhere on the planet.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by: