Elevated A Frame

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by Bush84, Jan 12, 2015.

  1. Bush84

    Bush84 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    So after some thought I have decided to slap together a small coop right away then go all in for the big coop. I want a 12x12 coop, but between time and finances I just don't think I can get it done by spring. So instead I will make a small coop quickly and much more cheaply and then slowly build the big one.

    I have been looking at designs. I found this one.

    https://www.backyardchickens.com/a/codybirds-page

    I like the thought of a quick a frame coop but yet still elevated for a sheltered run. My main question is, is there any reason the run underneath has to be slanted? I am no carpenter but have all the tools needed to build a shed. Can I have a 4x8 run underneath with straight walls with an a frame on top? I guess I don't see why not but didn't see one in the coops page. They are all straight up triangles.
     
  2. Percheron chick

    Percheron chick Chillin' With My Peeps

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    They are slanted in the bottom because it's all one piece of wood. If you did the top in an A and the bottom straight, you would have to cut all the piece separately and than how are you going to join them? The A construction is as easy as it goes. It is also more stable and less apt to be flipped over by an animal.
     
  3. Bush84

    Bush84 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Between a compound miter saw, screws, and brackets I think it's doable. It would be nice to not have to lose the base size because of sloped sides.
     
  4. HandsomeRyan

    HandsomeRyan Renaissance man

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    What is the advantage of straight sides to the run and an A frame coop? If you want a straight sided run, why not just make a straight sided coop on top as well?

    As the other poster pointed out, the A frame is popular because you can use straight boards without the need for fancy mitered cuts and joinery. You mentioned in your post that you are "not a carpenter" so I guess I'm a little unclear why you would intentionally make a more complicated design?
    If you don't have time or money to build the coop you really want right now, why waste the time and money engineering straight sides when the A frame is a relatively inexpensive, simple, and proven design?

    It is your coop and you should absolutely build it the way you want. The reason no one else is building coops like that is because it is an unnecessarily complicated design with very little if any functional improvement over a traditional A-framed or straight sided coop and run. Good luck whatever you decide to do. Be sure and get pictures to share!
     
  5. Bush84

    Bush84 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    The advantage is to maximize the square footage of the coop. With the a frame design with a run beneath you lose square footage due to the fact that it's a triangle. The higher you get the smaller the space. The other thought is just building the coop on cinder blocks. This would elevate the coop to have a run underneath but still allow the basic design of the a frame coop. It should be mentioned that this is going on concrete. The slab was already there (to feed cattle I think). So I'm going to use it as a pre made foundation. So it should be easy enough to use blocks to raise it up. How high do I need it for chickens to move around?
     
  6. Bush84

    Bush84 Chillin' With My Peeps

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  7. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

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    It took a bit but I think I understand. You are limited in the footprint where it touches the ground. That is one disadvantage of the A-frame, the higher you go the less room you have.

    The more difficult part will be in getting the connections to fit. The connections are normally the most critical part of any construction. Even with that saw you may have a challenge getting a perfect fit. Still, you can manage.

    Two feet is a pretty good height for the run portion as far as the chickens are concerned. The disadvantage is that it will make it pretty hard for you to do any work under there if you need to. But since it is temporary you can probably live with it.

    If you can I suggest you leave it. A second place to keep chickens if you need to separate them comes in really handy.
     
  8. Bush84

    Bush84 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Once I build my big coop, I was thinking I could use this for broody hens once I get to that point. But Ya the gambrel roof seems to be a bit much. I bought the 2x4s today I will have to keep thinking about it.
     
  9. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

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    I don’t know how big your area is but an easy way to build is to just go straight up at the corners but have two of those corners higher than the other two and have a single sloped roof. The only complicated cuts are the four angled cuts at the top of your corner posts. That’s assuming this area is not that big. That way you don’t have to worry about getting a watertight seal up top like you do with an A-frame roof.

    There are a lot of different ways to do it.
     
  10. Bush84

    Bush84 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Ya I had been thinking about that, but the more I think about it the more I think I should just keep it simple. The A frame reduces needed material. It will save money and time.

    https://www.backyardchickens.com/a/a-classy-a-frame-tractor

    I'm thinking about just doing this and moving on. It doesn't state how big the coop space is but I will only start with 5-6 chickens.
     

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