HELP! Peaowl with bad eye opens mouth shakes head.

Discussion in 'Peafowl' started by ookin, Mar 6, 2014.

  1. ookin

    ookin Out Of The Brooder

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    I have had chickens from kindergarten and never had any get sick. This is my first time caring for a peafowl. He has a 50x15 ft run and a warm coop. Recently He had a swollen eye and kept it closed. After a few days of cleaning and applying cream to the eye, it is open again. But now his feathers are a bit ruffled, he opens and closes his mouth and shakes his head. He also seems weak. He is in the coop with a few chickens but they get along. I don't know what i should do. Any treatment ideas?
     
  2. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    Can you take him to a vet?

    -Kathy
     
  3. ookin

    ookin Out Of The Brooder

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    I am planning to take him to one tomorrow or on Sunday. I just wanted to know if anyone already knew what was wrong with him.
     
  4. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    Sounds like it's a respiratory infection. Your vet will be able to listen to his lungs and prescribe the right antibiotics for him. Your vet will also be able to give him fluids if he needs them. The sooner you start treatment, the better his chance of survival.

    -Kathy
     
    Last edited: Mar 6, 2014
  5. Dany12

    Dany12 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Infectious Coryza ...► Injectable tylan or powder.
     
    Last edited: Mar 6, 2014
  6. KsKingBee

    KsKingBee Overrun With Chickens

    We just went through that. The people here recommended one ml Tylan 200 injected just under the skin behind the neck at the base of the shoulders. All of ours responded quickly but one who needed a second injection three days later.
     
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2014
  7. ookin

    ookin Out Of The Brooder

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    Eve though his eye is is open again it looks cloudy and irritated. Is that from an infected Coryza too?
     
  8. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    A cloudy eye can be from aspergillosis, which is a fungal infection that can look exactly like some of the bacterial infections poultry get. You could try something like Tylan, but if you don't see improvement very quickly you should go to the vet.

    http://www.merckmanuals.com/vet/exo...s/mycotic_diseases_of_pet_birds.html#v3305544
    http://www.merckmanuals.com/vet/pou...overview_of_infectious_coryza_in_poultry.html
    http://www.merckmanuals.com/vet/pou...nfection_in_poultry.html?qt=mycoplasma&alt=sh

    Remember that peafowl hide illness well and are often on deaths door by the time people notice they are sick and often need supportive care like fluids and tube feeding. The feedstore I go to had 28 peafowl that came down with a respiratory infection, but they waited too long to treat them and two died.

    A sick bird is often very thin, hypothermic and dehydrated, so one must address those issues, too.

    -Kathy
     
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2014
  9. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    This is from the aspergillosis section of the AAAP Avian Disease Manual:

    CLINICAL SIGNS

    1. Dyspnea, gasping, cyanosis and accelerated, labored breathing frequently are observed. Rales do not usually accompany these respiratory diseases. Other signs include diarrhea, anorexia, somnolence, progressive emaciation, dehydration and increased thirst.

    2. Morbidity is variable. Mortality is high in clinically affected birds. Increased mortality will be noted in affected flocks during loadout, hauling and following insemination. Affected birds often die during or just after handling especially if held by their legs.

    3. Signs of central nervous system disturbance may occur in a small percentage are of the birds if there has been spread to the brain. Signs often include ataxia, falling, pushing over backwards, opisthotonos, paralysis, etc.

    4. A gray-white opacity may develop in one or both eyes when there is eye infection. Ocular discharge occurs when the conjunctiva is infected and there can be corneal ulceration. A large mass of exudate typically accumulates in the medial canthus under the third eyelid.

    -Kathy
     
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2014
  10. Yoda

    Yoda Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Your bird has a respiratory infection and like Dany12 and KSKingBee said tylan 200 will work.

    Kathy this disease is caused from very very contaminated food and litter. I am sure if it was that bad some of his chickens would also be sick. Here is a website on the disease.
    http://www.aspergillus.org.uk/indexhome.htm?secure/veterinary/Poultdis1.html~main
    It also says to kill the birds infected cause there is no cure for it. Here is more on it:
    While there is no connection between aspergillosis and the H5N1 strain of avian influenza (commonly called "bird flu"), rapid die-offs caused by aspergillosis can spark fears of bird flu outbreaks. Laboratory analysis is the only way to distinguish bird flu from aspergillosis.
     

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