Horses

Lynzi777

Crowing
7 Years
Mar 26, 2012
3,947
324
258
Woodstock, CT
I have a question for all of you horse owners. I am a beginner, am getting some basic lessons on how to care for, groom, ride for pleasure - nothing more than some basic trail riding lessons. I've wanted a horse my entire life. I finally have the time, the space needed, etc to do it. I'm not sure when I will be ready/feel comfortable enough to purchase one of my own but when I do I wonder...would it be better for me (as a beginner) to get a gelding who is trained and has the experience, or would it not be such a bad idea to get a colt so that I could train it and grow with it as a rider? This way it would know my commands from the start. I've been doing a lot of thinking about this and I wonder what are the pros and cons for a beginner like myself to own a colt vs a gelding who's a little older and already been trained a certain way.
 

LissyB

Chirping
7 Years
A gelding would know what to do, if you got a colt you would need a lot of a firmer hand as you could teach it bad habits that would take forever to train it not to do. If you are working with somebody it might be ok, but you can ruin a young horse very easily. But with a little patience you could do it! I personally would get a gelding, and once I'm experienced, get a colt that I could train. Hope this helps!
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Lynzi777

Crowing
7 Years
Mar 26, 2012
3,947
324
258
Woodstock, CT
That makes sense. Thanks so much for your input. If I got a gelding, and it was trained with someone else before coming to me, is it easy to train them the way you want to handle them and command them? Or do you basically have to go off of what the other person did with that horse? Sorry if these seem like stupid questions, it's just I met the most amazing horse the other day and I swear if I could have any horse right now he'd be the one. He was just awesome, he knew a lot of voice commands and is just eager to please. There was no trying in getting this horse to do anything. If you said it he did it. Is it easy to train a horse basic horse commands that may not know them before coming to you?
 

GhostRider65

Songster
8 Years
Mar 6, 2011
1,579
24
151
NE Wisconsin
Wow! That's old!:eek:   I had a couple arabians when I was tiny. Mine is a quarter mixed with a thorough bred. (hence the size)

 

That is not even old my hay guy has an old ..... i MEAN OLD arab gelding still kicking no teeth, looks terribly thin....but still going at 46 he will 47 if he makes the winter
Anyway another horse lover here we had 4 down to 3 since I lost my old Appy Gelding shadow.... here are some pictures of my babies
700
My old man Shadow lost his in 09 to colic @ 24
700

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Ana gettinga ride on my hubbies StandardBred gelding Jack
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Moms girl registered Appy Tessers
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All the babies still here Jack Tess, and the kids pony Lia
 
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theoldchick

The Chicken Whisperer
Premium Feather Member
10 Years
May 11, 2010
30,952
12,694
777
I have a question for all of you horse owners. I am a beginner, am getting some basic lessons on how to care for, groom, ride for pleasure - nothing more than some basic trail riding lessons. I've wanted a horse my entire life. I finally have the time, the space needed, etc to do it. I'm not sure when I will be ready/feel comfortable enough to purchase one of my own but when I do I wonder...would it be better for me (as a beginner) to get a gelding who is trained and has the experience, or would it not be such a bad idea to get a colt so that I could train it and grow with it as a rider? This way it would know my commands from the start. I've been doing a lot of thinking about this and I wonder what are the pros and cons for a beginner like myself to own a colt vs a gelding who's a little older and already been trained a certain way.

Since you are a first time horse owner you need a horse who is trained in what you want to do. Geldings have a tendency to be more consistent in their temperament. Some mares are moody and unpredictable due to hormonal changes. By colt do you mean a youngster who needs training or an intact male who will grow into a stallion? Definitely stay away from a stallion.

Young horses need a person to teach them manners so they can get along with humans. If you are set on getting a young horse make sure to get a trainer to help you along the way. The most important thing you can remember about horses is the moment you touch your horse you are teaching it something, and you need to make sure that something is good. Young horses are unpredictable. They have regressions that test your patience, and you need to have the knowledge to avoid a wreck.

If you want to get out on the trail and not have to worry about spooks, horse eating monsters, and generally baby sitting your horse, I recommend you get a well trained gelding.

However, if you want to take the journey of finishing a young horse, definitely make sure your health insurance is up to date, and find a trainer to help you with your goals.

Be safe and wear your helmet.
 

LissyB

Chirping
7 Years
Quote:
I definetely agree with that, oldchick!

Quote:
Wow that is old!
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They are all so beautiful!

Quote: My horse has practically learned the human language since I got her (she's 13) I hope you find the right horse! I got mine from my grandpa, he breeds QH, so didn't really go through that stress since he knew which of his horses would be right for us! But if it's anything like getting a dog, it's STRESSFUL!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
 

Lynzi777

Crowing
7 Years
Mar 26, 2012
3,947
324
258
Woodstock, CT
Well next on the list of things to do is some research on some breeds! I do see a lot of QH's and even the woman I'm getting the lessons from has mostly QH's. And then here I am, I saw a listing for a Haflinger and LOVED them! But I definitely have to reading up to do.
 

GhostRider65

Songster
8 Years
Mar 6, 2011
1,579
24
151
NE Wisconsin
Well next on the list of things to do is some research on some breeds! I do see a lot of QH's and even the woman I'm getting the lessons from has mostly QH's. And then here I am, I saw a listing for a Haflinger and LOVED them! But I definitely have to reading up to do. 

Your best horses for temper ment, and cakmness needed for ease of training are either a QH, a Halflinger, or maybe a Morgan......... try avoiding for a first horse an Arab, a saddle bred, Adalusions, these are more the hotter breeds, and best with an owner who has experience in handling them........ although and older Arab could be a wonderful riding buddy, make sure its bomb prof and well trained b4 ya buy it........... wish ya were closer there is sosme very nice horses for sale here on Craigs list, that the owners just can't keep due to the hay shortage thins year........
 

LissyB

Chirping
7 Years
I have an appendix, that's a mix between a QH and a thoroughbred. She is so calm, she lets my 4yr old brother lead her around! She's never kicked, never bitten (on purpose) she did buck me and my cousin off one time, we were running her and she tripped, must have scared the crap out of her cuz she buck a few times. She's never done that since, and you could tell by the look on her face that she was sorry and that it was an accident. Anyways all of my grandpa's QH's are so sweet and docile, one stallion will let you sit on him while he eats! I've been feeding that one since I could walk! But if I could get another horse, it would be a gelding, mood swings get annoying.
 

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