Importing chicks and/or pullets/cockerels

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by Falkenhof, Jan 16, 2013.

  1. Falkenhof

    Falkenhof Out Of The Brooder

    40
    1
    26
    Nov 5, 2012
    I was wondering if anyone had experience with importing already hatched chicks or older pullets/cockerels. I've imported larger livestock before and exported but it seems smoother to send a horse on its way than a pullet.

    I've found an extremely good example of a very rare breed of chicken not sold in the USA and hard to find in Europe. While I've looked over the USDA's site regulations, I was curious to know the actual cost of things. Since we all know those extra expenses add up.

    Also would be interested to know the success rate and cost of importing hatching eggs if anyone has experience with that. I rather ship 4-6 birds and have a better shot at getting all of them here alive than pay for 50 eggs and only hatch out 1 and do the process all over again. Not to mention the money I would drop on their own private coops and runs that would be lost.

    I understand the price chart on the website but I mean a total dollar amount anyone has dropped and how long ago that was. I am very serious about getting these birds here for showing and breeding.
     
  2. 3riverschick

    3riverschick Poultry Lit Chaser

    7,610
    1,654
    421
    May 19, 2009
    western PA
    My Coop
    This is a really loaded question, but I will take a stab at it.
    If you are importing from Canada to the USA, it is relatively easy. As long as you use a land crossing, no import permit needed.
    Next step is to check if the country you are importing from is considered disease free. If so, things will be easier than if not.
    Last time I read of someone importing birds, it ran about $1,000.USD a bird ,total. Course then everyone wants get from them so you end up making your money back.
    Personally, I think success may also depend n the import quarantine location you select. Check with each and see what their health record is for problems with disease at that location. Plus, facilities and esp. ventilation of the buildings. Take no detail for granted.
    Then there is the problem of paperwork being held in hands other than yours. It brings to mind the story of a lady who was importing poultry from England to USA, She and the english breeder had all the proper tests done. All T's crossed and I's dotted, When, as I remember, one bird somehwere might be sick with something so the whole import was cancelled.
    Another lady imported from England to USA thru New York USDA quarantine. The birds came down with a simple cold which was treatable . Under US law the birds were not required to be destroyed. But the USDA destroyed the whole flock anyway despite the importers' protests. So, you really are at the mercy of other people's hands.
    Perhaps getting a professional animal importer to handle the arrangements might be a wiser idea.
    Using a "known shipper", rather than being a "nobody" to the people in power.
    Just my thoughts,
    Karen
     
    Last edited: Jan 18, 2013
    1 person likes this.
  3. Falkenhof

    Falkenhof Out Of The Brooder

    40
    1
    26
    Nov 5, 2012
    Thank you! That is very helpful. I want to do my best to make sure the chickens make it through quarantine and arrive safely. Have you any way of knowing how to find a reputable animal importer? All the ones I am familiar with handle equines only.
     
  4. 3riverschick

    3riverschick Poultry Lit Chaser

    7,610
    1,654
    421
    May 19, 2009
    western PA
    My Coop
    I remember one in Florida which handles all kinds of animals. Found him surfing around the Net. Don't remember the name. A search might turn him up. Don't know anything about reputation, just remember the listing. Maybe contact your local Zoo.
    Karen
    Now there's a thought, maybe they wuld like some for the Zoo and ya'll can work some kind of deal so you get some too.
     
    Last edited: Jan 20, 2013
  5. cluckcluckluke

    cluckcluckluke Overrun With Chickens

    I know nothing of this but if you ship live fowls over seas they probably wont lay again and it will stress them out so much they may never recover.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by