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IVERMECTIN-pour on dosage

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by chooniecat, Dec 4, 2012.

  1. chooniecat

    chooniecat Chillin' With My Peeps

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    central ohio
    OK-tons of conflicting info and I THINK I have the little bit I could understand correct. POUR ON 1/2cc per bird(standard chickens)on skin.Somewhere on here it was said "6 drops per bird" BUT what kind of dropper????Could cause HUGE dosage difference if different "droppers" are used. So I am going with the 1/2 cc suggestion(between shoulder blades) Is this possibly a problem? I hate to go to the effort(32 birds tonight) if it will have NO effect and I also don't want them to die!TY.
     
    Last edited: Dec 4, 2012
    1 person likes this.
  2. cowcreekgeek

    cowcreekgeek Chillin' With My Peeps

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    First, there are different formulations ...
    Which Ivermectin are you using?
    Second, there are different uses ...
    Are you treating for internal or for external parasites?

    ::edit:: noticed you weren't online, soOo ...

    Ivermectin (1% injectable for cattle)
    Since Ivermectin went off-patent, there are several manufacturers producing it. Ivermectin has been used orally via extra-label scripts to treat Northern Fowl Mite and capillaria infestations. Only mites that are on the birds are killed. The 1% injectable cattle formulation has been used as follows
    (personal communication):
    • 1 ml of 1% Ivermectin injectible + 1 ml. propylene glycol + 2 gal H2O, proportion at 1 oz./gal D.W.
    • Administer 2 times, 10-14 days apart. There is a 30 day withdrawal (destroy commercial eggs for 30 days post-therapy.)
    Published by the Department
    of Avian Medicine, University of Georgia
    Editor: Charles Hofacre, Associate Professor, Department
    of Avian Medicine
    Phone (706) 542-5645 Fax (706) 542-5630
    e-mail: [email protected]
    Page 1 of 8
    Issue 60 April 2002
    The Poultry Informed Professional is published by the Department of Avian Medicine of the University of Georgia College of Veterinary Medicine. [​IMG] 1999 Board of Regents of the University
    System of Georgia except for: United States Government Publications:”Livestock, Dairy and Poultry Situation and Outlook” (Economic Research Service, U.S.D.A); “Broiler Hatchery” and
    “Chicken and Eggs” (National Agricultural Statistics Service, Agricultural Statistics Board, U.S.D.A.) [​IMG] 1999 Bayer Corporation.

    Document Title:

    WITH HYGROMYCIN GONE, WHAT
    ARE TODAY’S WORMING OPTIONS?
     
    Last edited: Dec 5, 2012
  3. chooniecat

    chooniecat Chillin' With My Peeps

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    central ohio
    Sorry-not on often-am using POUR ON Ivermectin(don't remember brand name) and it is TOPICAL(thats what I read on here previously)And I DO have the Ivermectin 1% injectable that I can use oral(in h20) but have another product(of course I can't remember name) that was suggested on here and have already dosed with that. I am just concerned, currently, with the topical dosage of the Ivermectin POUR ON to use topically(don't see external pests on my domestic fowl but I want to make positive as have had mites on my skin from front porch wild birds!!)
     
  4. taprock

    taprock Chillin' With My Peeps

    This is what I do per our poultry vet - doesn't always mean it's right.

    I use ivomec pour on for cattle (5 mg/ml). I put 3 drops on bantams, 4 regular, 5 really big or fluffy and 6 on my guineas. I use it for Fowl mites. You don't have to withhold eggs. I was told every three weeks but then it was changed to sooner if needed. Also I use a plain old eye dropper. I have had no adverse effect overdosing, as I can say a couple wilder acting birds got much more than directed. I have 63 chickens and 5 guineas so it takes a while. I usually do it after dark with a headlamp and just climb around the coop. Good luck
     
    3 people like this.
  5. cowcreekgeek

    cowcreekgeek Chillin' With My Peeps

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    The injectible in water is the only treatment that vets can get away w/ doin' under current FDA rules, and the pour-on goes beyond off-label use, despite folks doin' it for quite some number of years. I do know of resistances developing w/in flocks, when it's used to often, or under-dosed just a few times. I've never read of overdosing, not that I've any studies to offer ... I wouldn't eat the eggs for at least ten days.

    The dropper used is the common drugstore variety of medicine droppers, by all but Nathalie Ross, who uses a 20 Guage needle as her dropper.

    Also, do NOT use the Ivermectin Plus, as it contains an additional wormer that is not safe for chickens.

    When your estimation is short, I'd dose the extra drop, as overdosing does not appear to be an issue w/in such narrow margins (i.e. the difference between the 7 or 9 drops is less than +/-12%.

    And, finally? I'm not a vet, and do not encourage you to violate FDA rules/regulations, and I have not personally verified these infromations, which I provide as a second-hand collection of other folks' suggestions.

    --- 00 ---

    For specifically the IVOMEC Pour-On for Cattle, from Drugs.com:

    The dose rate is 1 mL for each 22 lb of body weight. The formulation should be applied along the topline in a narrow strip extending from the withers to the tailhead.

    --- 01 --- Randy Henry

    Directions for 5% ivomec with oil base put on shoulder
    only not internally.
    (1 1 drop small bantam such as female OE
    (2 2 drops large bantam male like OE
    (3 3 drops most bantams
    (4 4 drops larger bantams and smaller commercial hens
    (5 5 drops commercial large fowl and smaller large
    fowl
    (5 5 drops Large fowl chicken
    (7 7 drops larger males of large fowl breeds of
    Chickens.

    --- 02 --- Nathalie Ross

    For the pour on (5% oil) Ivermectin (not Eprinex) the dosage I
    use is as follows:
    1 drop - OEGB sized small bantam female
    2 drops - OEGB sized small bantam male
    3 drops - average bantams
    4 drops - large bantams, small commercial fowl
    5 drops - most commercial fowl, small giant hens
    6 drops - giant breeds of chicken

    I always use a 3 cc syringe that I just fill to about 2 cc's with a 20 gauge needle. The needle WON'T be injected into the chicken, but does make it easier to dispense a controlled correct sized drop. It also is easier to get in there between the feathers.

    NOTE: Confirmed this info in a second incident or author, in a different post.

    --- 03 ---

    TazneenDragon, via Rating system of Amazon
    specific product: Vurvet Ivermectin Pour On 250 Ml

    It's pretty much the same for chickens, which is how I discovered this product. Nothing else could get rid of the scaly feet mites because they didn't have them bad enough to raise the scales substantially, so that topicals had a problem getting in the small crevices. Between the topicals and the Ivermectin, everyone is making a great recovery. For small bantam hens, 3 drops. 4 drops for bantam roosters. I give around 9 drops to my 7 pound rooster. Make sure to give it every two weeks, though, because it is only effective on parasites that take blood meals. That means that anything in egg form will not be effected, so you will have to get them as they hatch out by keeping on top of the two week schedule.
     
    2 people like this.
  6. chooniecat

    chooniecat Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 2, 2009
    central ohio
    Don't know if the 20guage(or ANY needle) can be purchased in store but will look. Am very financially challenged and paid for the meds and was hoping to use the syringes I HAVE but as long as I know specifically what ya'll are using for "drops" THAT helps. Thanks![​IMG]
     
  7. cowcreekgeek

    cowcreekgeek Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hurricane, WV
    Just go in any pharmacy, 'n get the standard eyedropper -- they're almost always the same size drop, as it's based more on the surface tension 'n such of the liquid dispensed. And, to put it in perspective: Fenbendazole has been proven safe to 100 times the suggested dosage (not that I'd try it, esp. w/ meds like this one ~'-)
     
  8. doublej

    doublej New Egg

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  9. doublej

    doublej New Egg

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    I dont usually use a needle, but drop drops straight from the syringe. Although its my experience that the ivermectin makes the rubber stopper on the plunger of the syringe start to get sticky and tougher to depress. I just bought a bag of plastic pipettes for like $5 on amazon and use those now. (Or can get the eye dropper like others suggested). I havent had problems overdosing my birds, especially when the ivermectin causes the syringe to stick (i just learned to draw up less at a time in case I screw up)
     
  10. Sagenovese

    Sagenovese Out Of The Brooder

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    I just bought 3 cc syringe and 20 gauge needle. It took about 50 drops from needle to equal 0.5 cc of 5mg/ml ivermectin cattle pour-on. That is a huge difference. Not sure if I should be counting droplets (about 9) or if I should be measuring and dispensing cc's.

    Please help clarify.
    Thanks!

    I left my chickens cooped up today so that I could run to store, buy supplies and come home to do this before letting them out to free-range. Sadly, poor ladies, may not get out to play at all today. Will be dark in just over an hour. Sigh.
     

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