Keeping Fish

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by LeafBlade12345, Oct 21, 2015.

  1. politicalcenter

    politicalcenter Chillin' With My Peeps

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    It is just my opinion but I think raising shrimp takes a lot of skill and know how.

    I am impressed.
     
  2. LeafBlade12345

    LeafBlade12345 Chillin' With My Peeps


    Freshwater shrimp are pretty easy to keep. Are you possibly thinking of saltwater true shrimp? I've had crayfish live for years, which are what these "shrimp" usually are, a subspecies of crayfish.
     
    Last edited: Jan 2, 2016
  3. politicalcenter

    politicalcenter Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I also hope that people don't think poorly of me because I raise fish to eat.

    With the wild harvest being what it is I think that the future is (at least in part) in fish farming.

    I am going to see If I can get some Tilapia for this summers and raise them. My catfish will be harvested as soon as they finish their last bag of feed. They are about a pound and a half on average.


    And LeafBlade...everyone loses a fish now and then.
     
  4. Ol Grey Mare

    Ol Grey Mare One egg shy of a full carton. ..... Premium Member

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    I don't see it as any different than the raising of chickens for consumption (or any other animal raised at home for the purpose of being eaten). As long as they are raised and processed humanely/properly what issue could be raised?
     
  5. LeafBlade12345

    LeafBlade12345 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Don't worry, no one should think disparagingly of you because of your choices! Most of us are quite nonjudgmental on these sort of things anyway, so don't ever feel uncomfortable voicing your opinions! I for one would LOVE to raise fish for food, but don't have the time or means to do it. We are excited to have you on this thread, welcome! Thank you for the support, I am mostly upset with my carelessness, it was quite dumb. Anyway, welcome!
     
  6. politicalcenter

    politicalcenter Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Well...two of my ponds are 1500 gallon swimming pools from Wal Mart. They will hold a lot of fish.

    Unless you live in an apartment it might not be that hard to raise a few fish. The local junior college has an 800 gallon tank just full of Tilapia and the water churns when they feed them. They have to put a net over the tank to keep them in. When I saw them they were about a pound or so a piece. I am going to get an appointment with the professor to see if he can guide me to some fingerlings as soon as the weather warms.

    I also raise plants and Tilapia tanks would serve to keep my houses warm and pay me back for some of the heat bill. I have over 300 pounds of catfish ready to harvest . I also have bluegill and Redear sunfish that have some size on them.

    I would love to try some red claw crayfish from Australia but the only place I know to get them is from Florida and they are very expensive.
    I can't afford to spend a lot of money just to lose it.
     
  7. Shellybean02

    Shellybean02 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Just for future reference, what is the most y'all would spend for a healthy betta with desirable traits, including shipping? Some bettas at the pet stores are good looking, but they are USUALLY your typical pet store, red or blue veil tails. EBay has some really nice looking bettas, and in the near future I would love to get a few. I just wouldn't want to spend $fifty for one just to have it die in a day... what would you say?
     
  8. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Peeps are a-peeping Premium Member

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    Bettas are not longed lived fish with a life span of about two years, so they might be alive that long or less. I can go to my local petco and find a lot of fancy varieties and colors for up to around 15 dollars. I personally like saving mine from Wal-Mart, they sometimes have some very pretty colors and types. I personally would buy locally, especially until you become familiar with keeping them and keeping them alive for long term.
     
  9. howfunkyisurchicken

    howfunkyisurchicken Overrun With Chickens

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    Agreed. Our last Betta was a rescue from Wally World. He was in bad shape when we brought him home (while others had already expired in their little cups :hit ). They gave him to us, because their assumption was that he'd likely not make it through the night. We nursed him back to health and he lived for about 2.5 years. I was sad when I found that little guy had finally kicked the bucket. Bringing him back from the brink made me quite attached to him. He'd eat his little food pellets from my fingers, would swim to the glass to say "hi" and just generally had alot of personality for a fish. Just didn't live long enough to suit me. RIP little Pippin.
     
  10. howfunkyisurchicken

    howfunkyisurchicken Overrun With Chickens

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    Thanks, but the shrimp have been really, really easy keepers. I do a small water change on their nano tank weekly and they get about a quarter of an algae wafer once a week (which they never seem to eat, they prefer eating off the plants, it seems). Now, my mom keeps a couple of really nice saltwater tanks with some shrimp in them, and those guys require a TON of care. Her tanks require a lot of work in general though. But, they're gorgeous, so I can see why she enjoys them. For what she spends on fish though, I couldn't imagine loosing a single one of them! I'll see if I can get some pictures of her tanks to share here, they're lovely. Her pride and joy (can't blame her, I'd be proud of them too :D ).
     

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