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Need some help - with African Grey - skin disease

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by evetig03, Nov 14, 2008.

  1. evetig03

    evetig03 New Egg

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    Nov 14, 2008
    I have an African Grey who was found in the wild for who knows how long last year. He recently developed a skin infection on the tops of his feet that was diagnosied as Staph.... Now after 4 wks - Staph is gone but feet still peeling and dry. I can tell he is in pain.

    He has plucked all the feathers from the infected areas and his feet have totally peeled of the black skin and now are flesh tone with yellowish patches of peeling skin and some are scabbed over. This goes up to his chest area and where his wings attach to the body.
    I have been using a creme given me from the vet which has aloe and oils in it to moisturize the area.

    I live in the country in TN and the vets out here don't know nothing about birds.... Thought I would ask you all for some help - maybe you have seen this before.
    I appreciate the help.

    would love to attach pics but don't know how
    maybe this will come up

    [​IMG]
    Evetig
     
    Last edited: Nov 14, 2008
  2. 77horses

    77horses ◊The Spontaneous Pullet!◊

    Aug 19, 2008
    [CONFIDENTIAL]
    aww that's sad. [​IMG] poor bird!
    My first thought was scaly leg mites, which all birds can get(poultry, parakeets, parrots, etc.) Here's some info I found at http://www.2ndchance.info/selfpluck.htm
    "Parasites
    are reported to occasionally cause feather itching and feather plucking. Although many books on birds say that external parasites, such as lice and mites, cause a bird to pluck out its feathers, lice are extremely uncommon on pet hook-billed birds in which self-plucking is a problem. That is why moth-ball-containing packets (naphthalene and camphor) hung in the cage are worthless. If mites or lice are actually determined to be present, the best treatment is to apply a diluted mixture of ivomectin to the bird or give ivomectin orally at 200micrograms per kilogram of bird. A light dusting of rotenone tomato dust is also a safe way to kill external parasites. A microscopic protozoan parasite of the intestine, Giardia, has also been reported to cause itching and self-plucking in lovebirds. I have never had a documented case of this kind presented to me in approximately 35 years of working with parrots. If, however, a case occurs, the treatment of choice is to place the bird on metronidazole (Flagyl) at 10-30miligrams per kilogram twice a day for ten days. It is extremely bitter unless specially formulated."


    Look up some things about lice/mites and other parrot illnesses. [​IMG]
    Good luck and I hope your little parrot gets better soon!


    BTW we own lots of Parakeets and two Cockatiels, but we have never had a problem with lice. Also, feather plucking can be caused by not enough nutrition and in this case you should get him some food or vitamins for this, such as a cuttle bone, grit(which is sandy stuff that helps a lot with digestion) and boiled eggs(shell and all) are good for birds to eat. [​IMG]

    I hope this helps! [​IMG]
     
  3. 77horses

    77horses ◊The Spontaneous Pullet!◊

    Aug 19, 2008
    [CONFIDENTIAL]
    Quote:"Myialges nudus

    A second type of mite that can infect birds is Myialges nudus. This mite most commonly is found on captive grey cheek parakeets, but also has been found on other species of birds. Unlike Cnemitocoptes, discussed in the previous article, Myialges causes severe itching. Infected birds become very debilitated, lose feathers, suffer weight loss and develop red, scaly, thickened skin. If untreated, death occurs within several months. These mites are microscopic, with all stages found in tunnels in the bird's skin. Flies and lice may be involved in transferring these mites to other birds. Diagnosis is by clinical signs and identification of the mites in scrapings from the skin. Treatment is with Ivermectin.

    Xanthomas

    Xanthomas are yellow to orange thickened, dimpled patches of skin composed of lipids and cholesterol accumulation. The pectoral (breast area), thighs, and wing tips are the most frequently affected. Xanthomas are often invasive as well destructive. These are most prevalent in budgies, cockatiels and cockatoos. The cause of xanthomas is unknown at the present time, but high fat diets may be contributory."



    I got this from http://www.birdsnways.com/wisdom/ww50eiv.htm and I HIGHLY advise that you visit this site. It has the names/descriptions of bird skin ilnnesses and other bacterial infections. These two that I found(above) seem to match what your parrot has.
     
  4. 77horses

    77horses ◊The Spontaneous Pullet!◊

    Aug 19, 2008
    [CONFIDENTIAL]
    but I really do think that it's Xanthomas, which, as it says above, "yellow to orange thickened, dimpled patches of skin composed of lipids and cholesterol accumulation".
     
  5. 77horses

    77horses ◊The Spontaneous Pullet!◊

    Aug 19, 2008
    [CONFIDENTIAL]
    Last edited: Nov 14, 2008
  6. evetig03

    evetig03 New Egg

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    Nov 14, 2008
    Thanks to all

    yes we have ck out for mites of all kinds, xanthomas and giardia - that's all negative.

    been cked for PDD disease as well

    This is a big mystery.
    in the meantime - he is not eating or drinking.
    I am handfeeding him and giving him water.

    frustrating.
    -evetig
     
  7. WoodlandWoman

    WoodlandWoman Overrun With Chickens

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    Wisconsin
    Poor boy! That looks terrible! I can understand why you're frustrated, when you've been trying to do everything you can for him. It sounds like he's been pretty thoroughly checked over.

    What was his usual diet before he stopped eating and what are you handfeeding him, now? What did he especially like to eat, of the foods you gave him?

    I would consider trying to contact some of the universities with vet schools that have avian practices. I'd also try contacting some of the more well known avian vets in the country. Give them the information you've given us, contact information for your vet, include the photos and ask them if they know what is wrong with your bird and what they would charge for a consultation. Also, if they can't help you, ask if there is someone else they could recommend? They may just volunteer some information that can help you.

    Alternatively, you could ask your vet for a referral or ask him to contact an avian specialist or vet school with an avian program.

    Is there any possibility that he's having a reaction to something in the topical that you're using? Or was he already having this extreme problem before you started the topical? Parrots can have allergies, although I hear about it most as it relates to diet. Some also react to the residue on smoker's hands, when handled, though.

    After being treated for an infection, it wouldn't hurt to try to re-establish some good gut bacteria in him, when you can. I hope you can find some help for him.
     
  8. WoodlandWoman

    WoodlandWoman Overrun With Chickens

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    May 8, 2007
    Wisconsin
    I did a little research with the help of goggle and now I'm wondering if this is Staphylococcal Scalded Skin Syndrome? I had honestly never heard of this before, but it really sounds and looks like that might be the problem. It's a complication of a staph infection that can happen to parrots or people. It's mostly a problem in those with poor immune systems. Apparently, the Staph (Staphylococcus) bacteria produces something which loosens the "cement" holding the various layers of the skin together. This allows sloughing of the top layer of skin.

    Poor boy. I wish I could do something for him. If this is what his problem is, as long as the infection is under control, protecting the areas from dehydrating and time sound like all you can do. As he starts to heal and has less pain, hopefully he will start eating on his own. It's so much harder to give analgesics to such tiny creatures.
     
  9. evetig03

    evetig03 New Egg

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    Nov 14, 2008
    Thanks for the help

    Ollie passes away today
    I could see it in his eyes
    His last sound was a kiss to me

    I will miss him terribly
    We have been thru much together

    -evetig
     
  10. 77horses

    77horses ◊The Spontaneous Pullet!◊

    Aug 19, 2008
    [CONFIDENTIAL]
    ohh that's terrible! I'm so sorry... :aww [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] poor boy... [​IMG]

    But at least now he's not in any pain any more and he's at peace. You did all you could to help him. [​IMG] please don't blame it on yourself.

    God bless you! [​IMG]
     

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