Only one chick surviving...

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by ValerieJ, Aug 23, 2019.

  1. ValerieJ

    ValerieJ Free Ranging

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    I ordered BO eggs online from the only source I could find at the time. I needed them fast because I wanted to give them to my broody hen. However, I was taking her eggs away every day and she stopped brooding before the eggs arrived. Anyway, because of the urgency, I ordered eggs from across country, the only place I could find BO eggs. I bought an incubator and I gave them all a chance, but only one developed at all, and that one is still growing at day 13.

    This is my first time incubating. Wasn't planning that at all, but here I am. Probably if there were several viable eggs I wouldn't be so stressed, but I have this one little baby and I want her/him to survive. I've been reading everything and anything about the incubation process, so my questions are for after hatch, because I believe this one will. (I believe! I believe! I believe!) :fl

    What kinds of problems are possible for a single chick hatch? Should I go buy some brooding mates the day she successfully hatches? What supplies should I have on hand? I have a tote and heat plate (coming) that she can pop in and out of. I bought medicated starter feed, which I've always used in the past. I have nutridrench, styptic powder and even Corid.

    I'm asking this because it is at least a two hour round trip to any farm store, so I just want to be prepared.

    Also, some people oppose medicated starter, and it's all I've ever used. I would love to hear some discussion on the pros and cons of that. It is weird to me that the bag says "will prevent but not eliminate coccidiosis", or something like that. What? Then why do I use it?

    Thanks. I asked some of these in my September Hatch along group, but didn't get answers to these questions, probably because it is off topic, so I thought I'd just start a whole new thread.
     
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  2. SueT

    SueT Crossing the Road

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    I hatched a single chick from an abandoned egg (and mama wouldn't allow the orphan in with her brood. ) So I had no choice but to quickly set up a brooder for it. It imprinted on me and cried loudly all the time I wasn't holding it. I found another chick at farm store and they were very happy together.
    Just use the feed you've already bought, it will be fine. I don't use medicated, but if you do, you have one less thing to worry about. There are countless threads on the subject, with good arguments on both sides. You've had success with it, just keep on using it.
    Good luck, fingers crossed your egg hatches! Be sure to post updates!
    Sue
     
  3. ValerieJ

    ValerieJ Free Ranging

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    Thanks for the advice, @SueT! Can you think of anything else I should have in my "medicine cabinet"?
     
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  4. slordaz

    slordaz Crowing

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    the problem with incubating shipped eggs is most tend to forget to let them settle first for 24 hours then check the air cells, but elevation at laying and incubating it can affect the outcome.
    This os one of the people that got me through learning to incubate but you should really study up on it before attempting as there are so many variables you need to know too

    @Ridgerunner
     
  5. ValerieJ

    ValerieJ Free Ranging

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    Thanks for your response @slordaz. I did allow them to sit for 24 hours and had the incubator going for 24 hours in advance. I really had no plans to incubate, ever. But I don't have a rooster, so when one of my hens was broody, I thought it would be nice to give her the opportunity. Unfortunately, when the eggs arrived, she was no longer interested. I had made the mistake of taking her eggs away every day. In the past when I have done that it never stopped the broody, but of course this time it did. Anyway, I have gotten a lot of advice on the September Hatch Along and have read many articles on hatching. That's all I did for several days, once finding myself in this dilemma. LOL So, my questions are really related to what to do after this little one hatches.

    The eggs took 5 days to get to me. Post office was supposed to have them here in 2. Something went wrong there.
     
  6. slordaz

    slordaz Crowing

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    best thing it so find a local resource, your much more likely to have good hatch if she goes broody again otherwise break her or give her golf balls, gl with the surviving one in the brooder
    I just used a normal 60 watt incandescent bulb and for jsut one a small box or dishpan is good,I used plain white paper towels to line it with less likely to slip and injur them selves, have a small dish and bigger rocks or marbles to put in so it cannot drown itself drinking, and a dish for starter crumbles, you will have to show it when it hatches to drink and where the food is, they will do the rest, to teach it to drink put just the tip of beak to the water do not get it any farther
     
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  7. ValerieJ

    ValerieJ Free Ranging

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    I agree.
     
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  8. ValerieJ

    ValerieJ Free Ranging

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    So, my question here is not, how should I have incubated, or how should I have ordered the eggs. My reasons for having them shipped have already been explained. I'm looking for advice on what items to have on hand, since I feel there is a possibility of problems with this little chick when/if she hatches.

    If anyone really wants to know why I ordered shipped eggs, or ordered eggs at all, or why I'm doing this, just send me a PM. I don't want to belabor that discussion here. It means I don't get my actual questions answered. :oops:
     
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  9. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Free Ranging

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    Should I go buy some brooding mates the day she successfully hatches?

    If you can find some chicks within a few days of its age, I'd get some. Chickens are social animals and take great comfort if they are around others. It's possible to raise a single chick, but it's harder. Putting a mirror in the brooder so it doesn't think it is alone and putting a stuffed animal in so it can snuggle can help. So the only things I'd have different would be a mirror and a small stuffed animal.

    Also, some people oppose medicated starter, and it's all I've ever used. I would love to hear some discussion on the pros and cons of that. It is weird to me that the bag says "will prevent but not eliminate coccidiosis", or something like that. What? Then why do I use it?

    Sorry but this will get long. First, look at the label to see what the medicine is. You are in the the US (thanks for including that info in your profile) so the odds are great that the medicine is Amprolium but there are a few different ones on the market. So check the label. What I'm going to say is only about Medicated feed where the medicine in Amprolium. If the medicine is something else or Amprolium plus something else, this does not apply.

    Amprolium is not an antibiotic. It does not treat or cure anything in the dosage in medicated feed. It is only about Coccidiosis. It inhibits the reproduction of the bug that causes Coccidiosis. Cocci can kill chicks if it gets bad enough. The problem with Cocci is not that the chicken is exposed to that bug, the problem occurs when the numbers in the chicks system gets out of hand. That bug thrives in warm wet conditions when chicken manure is present, in the brooder, coop, or run. It thrives in dirty water. In these conditions the chick eats the "eggs" and the numbers get huge. That can kill. If you keep water clean and the brooder, coop, and run dry Cocci is usually not a problem. But there are different strains of that bug, some stronger than others. Even if you keep things clean and dry some can still cause a problem. You always have to keep a watch.

    I consider them being exposed to that bug a good thing. After a couple of weeks of exposure to that bug the chick develops an immunity to it. Just don't let it get out of hand. I start feeding my brooder-raised chicks dirt from the run at Day 2 and repeat every three or four days to introduce that bug so they can work on building up immunity to it. I consider feeding them dirt to give their overall immunity system a kick start in getting stronger for this and other things, gets grit in their system. and they get some probiotics from the adults. I keep my brooder dry and the water clean. I do not use medicated feed, I've never needed it. If you have a history of Cocci it can be a good idea.

    The dosage of Amprolium in medicated feed does not stop all reproduction of that bug. It inhibits reproduction so the chances of the numbers getting out of hand are greatly reduced. By allowing some reproduction it allows them to develop immunity. Even with medicated feed the numbers can still get out of hand if conditions are not good. Or if your adult flock is immune but still passing those "eggs" so they build up and the conditions are wet chickens that are not immune can have issues. Chicks raised by broody hens develop that immunity and seldom have problems, but if the run is wet and they don't have a dry place to take the chicks much of the time even these can have problems. In a brooder you control moisture and can keep clean water.

    Feed medicated with Amprolium does not give your chicks immunity. They have to be exposed to that bug for two weeks or so (use three weeks to be sure) before they can develop immunity. One too common occurrence is that people feed medicated feed to the chicks in the brooder but the chicks are never exposed to that bug so they can't develop immunity. When they leave the brooder and hit the ground where they are exposed to that bug they stop the medicated feed. The chicks develop Cocci and people say the medicated feed didn't work. The medicated feed worked fine, it just wasn't used right.

    There is nothing wrong with medicated feed. It will not harm your chicks. If used properly it can help. If not used properly, it adds no value.
     
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  10. ValerieJ

    ValerieJ Free Ranging

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    Thanks so much! That was so informative! My medicated feed does have the Amprolium in it, but I might not use it this time. I have not had to deal with coccidiosis yet in any of my birds. I've never added dirt from the run to their brooder, but I will this time. If I understand you correctly, adding the dirt will give them exposure and build immunity regardless of whether I use the medicated feed or non-medicated feed.

    Oh, and I do have a teddy bear and mirror on hand in case I cannot find a couple chicks to put in with her/him.
     
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