perfect!!! i would love some questions answered! excited this thread is here!

rosa1347

Chirping
Mar 30, 2015
38
19
67
Ok, last monday we got a surprise visit from my mother in law and she brought me a pair of doves that had blown from a tree in a storm the previous saturday, gave it till monday morning and they were near death and she figured i'd be able to save them.

I would say roughly they are about 11 days old based on what i've seen in charts online. they have their pretty feathers in, when we got them they were almost nakie! lol

well i've fed them every three hours sense i've had them, i've got them started on seeds, and i was curious of a few things.

1. How do you know what their gender is? or can you this early?

2. I'm sure they are mourning doves, so when will they coo like adults?

3. When will they want to fly the coop so to speak?

4. will me having them from a young age domesticate them?

5.If the above answer is yes, should i keep them?

I know they are wild, i want to let them free as soon as their ready, i've loved taking care of them as much as i've enjoyed my little ladies in the hen house, but if they won't do well sense i've had them so young... I just want to do good by them. you know? :)
 

jak2002003

Crowing
Oct 24, 2009
3,146
1,265
396
Thailand
Ok, last monday we got a surprise visit from my mother in law and she brought me a pair of doves that had blown from a tree in a storm the previous saturday, gave it till monday morning and they were near death and she figured i'd be able to save them.

I would say roughly they are about 11 days old based on what i've seen in charts online. they have their pretty feathers in, when we got them they were almost nakie! lol

well i've fed them every three hours sense i've had them, i've got them started on seeds, and i was curious of a few things.

1. How do you know what their gender is? or can you this early?

2. I'm sure they are mourning doves, so when will they coo like adults?

3. When will they want to fly the coop so to speak?

4. will me having them from a young age domesticate them?

5.If the above answer is yes, should i keep them?

I know they are wild, i want to let them free as soon as their ready, i've loved taking care of them as much as i've enjoyed my little ladies in the hen house, but if they won't do well sense i've had them so young... I just want to do good by them. you know? :)
Well done for helping these 2 doves.. seems you are doing a great job!

You can not tell the gender at this early age. (some people say about the distance between the pelvic bones.. but its difficult to do if you have no experience.. and even more difficult on such small doves as you have).

They will start to coo once they are sexually mature... probably about 85 days old (so it says on the net).

I think they will stay where they know there is food around, so if you leave a dish of seeds and water in your yard they will stay around.. unless some adults already live there and they will chase them off.

Hand rearing them will make them less frightened of you.. but you have not domesticated them.. they are still wild birds and once you stop having contact with them they will go back to being scared of you. Also once they are independent they will be scared of strangers.. even if you wear a different coloured coat or a hat they will get scared of you.

If you want to keep them they need the same care as ringneck doves.

life in the wild is risky for them.. just the same as if they got reared by their parents... but they stand a good chance once they can fly and feed on their own.

With my rescue birds I do something called a 'soft release'. You can follow these steps if you want to release them.

1. House them in a predator proof cage / aviary / coop in your garden where they are protected from rain and can see all around.

2. Keep food and water in there.. and reduce your contact with them over about 1 - 2 weeks.

3. After about 3 weeks open the aviary door and leave them to do what they want.

TIPS.. usually they will stay in the cage for a few more days before getting the courage to leave. They will likely come in and out of the cage to feed.. and doves or pigeons will probably roost in there at night.

Keep food and water in the cage until you know they are finding enough on their own outside (maybe put a feeder in you garden).

Make sure the door is big enough with a landing area so they can easily get back in if they want.

If they are in there at night.. SHUTE THE DOOR so cats can't get in.

Don't bee too upset if something bad happens... its nature and you will have given them the very best start.

Good luck with whatever you decided to do.
fl.gif
 

JRNash

Crowing
May 16, 2015
5,762
1,686
316
Mauriceville,Texas
I found a morning dove last night at work. I work in an oil refinery and the doves are everywhere.As a rule we don't mess with them.This one,managed to get itself right in the middle of a catch basin where we were draining water into. It was half dead and its wings were loose. I thought it was a goner for sure. I got it dried up using toilet paper,placed it in a box with a light. To my suprise it was still alive this morning. Putting it back where I found it wasn't an option. Brought it home its about half feathered. I mashed up some boiled rice and added just a little oatmeal. It was a chore but I was able to get some of this concoction into it.Now my question is this. What do I do now? What should I be feeding it and how?? I know it should be getting crop milk. What can I do to give this little guy a chance? Any suggestions would be appreciated. I'm asleep on my feet so I will check in when I wake up. Thanks for taking the time to read this.
 

laughingdog

Crowing
8 Years
Feb 16, 2011
2,367
335
256
Newport Tennessee
Slide layer pellets down its right side/left side facing, its mouth to throat, it will get idea and learn it food n eat them offered arter while on own (maybe week). Dip its beack in its water up to nostrils tip, every now and then until you notice level of water going down/its drinking on own.
Get pelleted feed, being easiest to feed, for chickens, or racing pigeon feed, are marketed for those two, but work for all doves. I feed chicken layer pellets to breeding etc performance n show pigeons (rock doves), n theyre great n stronger than most, only ever getting dislocated wrist whatd be on us, qnd dented pelvic bones,from BOP/raptor/falcans hawks etc.
 
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