Rooster/cockerel starting to crow- who’s used a ‘collar’?

JaneBrook

Chirping
Oct 8, 2018
45
98
79
Isle of Sheppey
JaneBrook, sorry I was unaware of you being a vegan. The next option would be rehoming them. Maybe someone close by would care for him.
That’s ok & I may well have too try that route but at the moment I’m hoping to find a solution that doesn’t cause him any cruelty or stress so he can continue with his happy life here with me…
 

FortCluck

Squatch Watchin'
Premium member
Sep 9, 2019
8,551
34,993
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Central Virginia
I have just spent 3hrs insulating the coop for sound & lining it to block the light - let’s hope that works… Many years ago I hatched a cockerel & spent weeks trying to find it a good home but nobody wants them & all I’m trying to do is find a way of saving its life!
As you are probably aware most are killed soon after hatching & im sure you will probably tell me that’s more humane but I’m not prepared to kill him…
You say that you are trying to save his life, but you are going to torture him to get to that point. He would be better off on a dinner table than spending the rest of his life with a collar on his neck that's man-made and has negative effects.

They are killed after they are hatched because they are not wanted. They are used for other things like dog food and such. They're still being used, but they're not being tortured. They're being killed quickly.
 

JaneBrook

Chirping
Oct 8, 2018
45
98
79
Isle of Sheppey
My experience was that I tried limiting light in early morning to trick their inner clock as I read but that didn’t work and I tired a collar and it quieted the sound however he choked on bulky foods and I had to take it off. Eventually I just rehomed him because I was uncertain about if he would choke when I’m not around
Thanks for the info - looks like collars are a no no & cruel… Going to try insulating/sound proofing because as long as I can quiet him down until 7’ish there won’t be a problem, thanks again for the advice x
 

FortCluck

Squatch Watchin'
Premium member
Sep 9, 2019
8,551
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Central Virginia
There is always going to be a negative consequence to trying to keep a rooster from crowing. That's all everyone is trying to show you.

I'm hoping that you insulating your coop works, but what about when he's outside?

If you are not allowed to have roosters where you live, it doesn't matter what you do to him he'll always be a rooster and you are not allowed to have a rooster. Nothing will change the fact that you are trying to bend the rules. I just know that it takes one person to bend the rules about roosters and they'll say you can't have chickens at all, it happens in a lot of areas.
 

Fairview01

Songster
Jan 26, 2017
1,002
1,398
216
Dallas, TX
I've had very good results using nothing more than a bit of double sided 2" wide velcro. I had wheatan Marans and the roosters are LOUD. They drove me crazy. The collars didn't stop them from crowing it just muted it. I thought the hens were louder letting after laying an egg.

I suspect those that had bad luck with them or found them ineffective dont see them for what they are. These collars are a management tool. They require regular maintenance and inspections - no less than once a week. I spent the better part of a whole day observing them when i first applied it. If they cant crow it's too tight. It takes many adjustments that first day to get it right where they'll still be able to crow but its muted like they have a sock in their beak.
 

JaneBrook

Chirping
Oct 8, 2018
45
98
79
Isle of Sheppey
There is always going to be a negative consequence to trying to keep a rooster from crowing. That's all everyone is trying to show you.

I'm hoping that you insulating your coop works, but what about when he's outside?

If you are not allowed to have roosters where you live, it doesn't matter what you do to him he'll always be a rooster and you are not allowed to have a rooster. Nothing will change the fact that you are trying to bend the rules. I just know that it takes one person to bend the rules about roosters and they'll say you can't have chickens at all, it happens in a lot of areas.
Yeh I was silly to start the thread in many ways but there a lot of knowledge on this site & I thought I might be able to tap into it…
As far as I know you can keep chickens & roosters where I live but the local council can issue you ‘noise abatement order’ if a neighbor goes to the council & complains but I’m not there yet & hopefully won’t be as I only have one neighbor that he could annoy & ive spoken to them & said “come talk to me before going to the council”
I seriously maybe naively thought that in today’s world there would be some sort of op or implant that would take away the male hormones a bit lol
 

Duck_life

Duck Addict
May 14, 2019
2,492
6,903
387
Woods of PA
Roosters crow because it is what makes them, them (Not really) . It chokes the rooster and is bad changing how a rooster acts, I would never take away a roosters crow just because he's my pet. I'd give him to someone who would allow him to be a rooster. It is torture. I say if you can't let him be a rooster he either goes to the table or re homing him. I'm not trying to hate on you, obviously you were just asking. But the people who do understand and still continue using them is cruel.
 

JaneBrook

Chirping
Oct 8, 2018
45
98
79
Isle of Sheppey
I've had very good results using nothing more than a bit of double sided 2" wide velcro. I had wheatan Marans and the roosters are LOUD. They drove me crazy. The collars didn't stop them from crowing it just muted it. I thought the hens were louder letting after laying an egg.

I suspect those that had bad luck with them or found them ineffective dont see them for what they are. These collars are a management tool. They require regular maintenance and inspections - no less than once a week. I spent the better part of a whole day observing them when i first applied it. If they cant crow it's too tight. It takes many adjustments that first day to get it right where they'll still be able to crow but its muted like they have a sock in their beak.
Arh interesting from what people are saying on here I thought they were just cruel but I’m at home all day with my chickens & could monitor him in much the same way you have - did it stress them out? Or did they adjust quickly?
 

JaneBrook

Chirping
Oct 8, 2018
45
98
79
Isle of Sheppey
Roosters crow because it is what makes them, them (Not really) . It chokes the rooster and is bad changing how a rooster acts, I would never take away a roosters crow just because he's my pet. I'd give him to someone who would allow him to be a rooster. It is torture. I say if you can't let him be a rooster he either goes to the table or re homing him. I'm not trying to hate on you, obviously you were just asking. But the people who do understand and still continue using them is cruel.
Bottom line if I can’t find away of curbing his crow humanly with as little stress as possibly I will need to find him a new home although that’s easier said than done as nobody wants cockerels… I have two dogs & although they do bark I don’t let them bark at antisocial times etc & have read about the BARBARIC operation in USA were they removed the voice box of the dog & declaw cats - thankfully that’s illegal in the UK
 
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