rooster purple comb, hens swollen faces & wattles, some sneezes, Broody girl has rasping...

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by redneck momma, Feb 18, 2014.

  1. redneck momma

    redneck momma Out Of The Brooder

    12
    0
    29
    Sep 24, 2013
    I plan to increase my flock size in the next 2 months. The chickens I have are 6 buff Orpingtons and have displayed these signs progressively since I got them from the 4H girl last summer. The first sign of trouble was the roosters comb turning purple at times.I mistakenly thought was a diet issue. Now with the long cold winter they are displaying swollen faces, sneezing, and some raspyness.( I brought them in and put them in the basement in december due to the cold.Still there cuz their sick.)The other day they were twisting their necks in a weird way so I gave em vitamins and they are acting normal again & happy but still swollen and raspy.Can I use Vet RX or will I have to cull them before the new chicks show up?
     
  2. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

    29,328
    3,393
    491
    Apr 3, 2011
    southern Ohio
    Welcome to BYC. These chickens are suffering from perhaps several different diseases. Swollen faces, wattles, sneezes and rasping can be symptoms of fowl cholera or coryza. I think you need to get a chicken tested by your state veterinarian, and cull the rest of your flock, then sanitize everything. Learn some biosecurity measures when it comes to taking care of chickens, before getting new chicks. And you may need to wait longer than 2 months.
     
    Last edited: Feb 18, 2014
    1 person likes this.
  3. redneck momma

    redneck momma Out Of The Brooder

    12
    0
    29
    Sep 24, 2013
    OK Thank You very much.
     
  4. redneck momma

    redneck momma Out Of The Brooder

    12
    0
    29
    Sep 24, 2013
    Do the chicks that hatched in the incubator have it as well?
     
  5. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

    29,328
    3,393
    491
    Apr 3, 2011
    southern Ohio
    MG or CRD can be transmitted through the hatching eggs, but other diseases aren't. If you handle the chicks after handling the sick birds, it can be transmitted on hands, clothes, shoes, and hair. Some respiratory diseases are transmitted through the air in droplets (infectious bronchitis.) If chicks have been in an incubator since hatch, they may be safe if they don't have MG. This is why it would be best to get a necropsy done on a sick bird. Click on this link to get the contact information from your state vet about testing or a necropsy: http://www.aphis.usda.gov/animal_health/animal_dis_spec/poultry/participants.shtml
     
    1 person likes this.
  6. redneck momma

    redneck momma Out Of The Brooder

    12
    0
    29
    Sep 24, 2013
    I did burn everything the other day. I dont want wild birds catching somethin, so I did work quickly. Although, luckily I couldnt burn the body of the little girl who gardened with me. I will ask my husband what he did with her body.Thank YOU SO MUCH for your time and eggspertise. [​IMG]There is so little reliable data out there.
    Gotta insurance problem? PM me. 22 years eggsperience, let me know Sir! & Thank You again!!!!!!!
     
  7. cafarmgirl

    cafarmgirl Overrun With Chickens

    There is actually a lot of reliable data available regarding poultry respiratory diseases. They are many and their symptoms often mimick each other. That's why having a dead bird necropsied or having testing done on a live bird is a very good idea. That way you will know exactly what you are dealing with and how best to proceed. I definitely would not bring in new birds until you have this situation resolved.

    As far a wild birds catching whatever this is... they are vectors that are often responsible for spreading some of these diseases in the first place. It's best to construct coop and run to keep them out but it can be very difficult to do so if your birds free range at all or have access to any open space.

    Good luck with your birds.
     
    1 person likes this.
  8. redneck momma

    redneck momma Out Of The Brooder

    12
    0
    29
    Sep 24, 2013
    You mentioned you know where to go to get the info to prevent this/and other diseases from happening gain. I have Storeys books, hobby farm series books and the APA. I am in the Schmidt happens business,my other job, and I like having as much data as possible. Its a pet-peeve of mine to make mistakes out of ignorance cuz it always seems to hurt so much! Thank You!!!
     
  9. cafarmgirl

    cafarmgirl Overrun With Chickens

    Not so much where to go to get the info to stop it happening again, that is not possible. But if you Google "poultry respiratory diseases" you can research the different respiratory diseases common to poultry, learn what the symptoms look like, what treatment is or is not likely to help, best methods of control, biosecurity methods to help prevent spread of disease etc. etc.
     
    Last edited: Feb 23, 2014

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by