Showgirl Genetics + Satin

roonster

Songster
5 Years
Jun 20, 2016
129
150
151
A bird can't carry the NN gene sight unseen. If they have a copy it shows.
Two copies is completely naked neck. One copy leaves a little patch. Those are often called "bowties"
What were the parents of these birds? That would help with your color question.
OP`s are single copy\bowtie, correct? 25% of offspring will be show and 25 no, if both parents are heterozygous.
 

JacinLarkwell

Crossing the Road
Mar 19, 2020
17,036
40,132
951
South-Eastern Montana
OP`s are single copy\bowtie, correct? 25% of offspring will be show and 25 no, if both parents are heterozygous.
What?

You're only coming up with 50% then.

If one is heterozygous and the other is a regular silkie (which it must be if there is no naked neck because the N gene is dominant, not recessive, then 50% will have an N gene and be showgirl and 50% will not at all.
 

roonster

Songster
5 Years
Jun 20, 2016
129
150
151
reread my post. 25 % of heterozygous will have two recessive genes if both parents are heterozygous...you "do the math" from there...and respond in a more polite manner in the future. thankyou. I will not respond to you or this thread any longer.
 

NatJ

Free Ranging
Mar 20, 2017
8,636
18,887
726
USA
OP`s are single copy\bowtie, correct? 25% of offspring will be show and 25 no, if both parents are heterozygous.

You didn't mention the 50% that will be heterozygous like the parents in that example. (It's not obvious to everyone :rolleyes: )

I agree with your numbers, if both parents are heterozygous for naked neck,
25% of chicks should be homozygous naked neck
25% of chicks should have feathered necks
50% of chicks should be heterozygous naked necks like their parents

But I think OP has one bowtie and one with a feathered neck, so they should get
50% heterozygous (bowtie)
50% feathered necks
 

roonster

Songster
5 Years
Jun 20, 2016
129
150
151
Alright, hope im not in over my head here. I want to make sure I have this atleast somewhat right.

I have this satin showgirl. And all of birds from the same hatch are showgirls except one roo. Who I guess is not a showgirl but rather a silkie because his neck is feathered ? but he's a silkie that's carries the "n" gene for Nakedneck Nn? And all birds from this hatch are black.

If I were to breed this black satin showgirl with white silkie roosters I could potentially get;
Satin or not satin
Showgirls
Or Silkies that carry the naked neck gene ?
And then also could get any coloring a white rooster might be hiding ?

Does this mean that the rest of the related chicks carry a satin gene that could be expressed later on ? I have no idea where satin gets mixed into silkies and if birds can be recessively hiding the satin gene.

Trying to make a plan for these showgirls because I want some colors other than black. Thanks!
It appears that everyone is over their heads when it comes to the genetics of phenotypes based on genotypes, there seems to be a mix of folklore and "a little knowledge is a dangerous thing", with a dash of poor reading comp, and a dollup of, "i rule the roost" (pun intended). if you want to discuss genetics with someone who has taught genetics and has a MS in genetics, let me know....
 

NatJ

Free Ranging
Mar 20, 2017
8,636
18,887
726
USA
You said show. NN and Nn will both show. Only nn won't
OP`s are single copy\bowtie, correct? 25% of offspring will be show and 25 no, if both parents are heterozygous.

It actually says "will BE show," which I took to mean homozygous naked neck because that way the numbers are correct. (I sort-of assumed it meant "show quality," but I did not bother to actually think further about it. I suppose it could mean "will be showgirls," which would be wrong because the bowtie form are also called showgirls.)
 
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