Suggestions for coop roof in WI

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by florachick_, May 20, 2017.

  1. florachick_

    florachick_ Just Hatched

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    May 17, 2017
    WI
    Hello!

    I'm a new chicken owner in SE Wisconsin (zone 5), and I've been trying to figure out what type of roof is best for the coop. I'm not sure if plywood or a corrugated material is best and if one is better than the other for ventilation? I am planning on adding several ventilation holes/rectangles, but am concerned about moisture build up in winter. I also don't plan on adding a heat source for winters. I have three EE's total and the coop is 3'x3' and the run is 9'x3'x5'. I've attached a design for the front of my coop that I made in Adobe Illustrator. The coop will be butted up against our garage and the front will be south facing. Thanks for reading!

    Screen Shot 2017-05-20 at 8.22.23 PM.png
     
  2. Ellie J.

    Ellie J. New Egg

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    May 20, 2017
    I too live in Wisconsin, and our coop has the same dimensions. The roof on the coop is just galvanized sheet metal. For the run, the roof is made of clear corrugated plastic for pole or garden sheds. Both of the roofs are at an angle and the coop is insulated for those cold winter nights. We also have removable greenhouse plastic sides for the run if it gets really cold. The run roof is at an angle for ventilation with wiring so they can't sneak out.
     
    Last edited: May 20, 2017
  3. florachick_

    florachick_ Just Hatched

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    May 17, 2017
    WI
    Thanks, Ellie J. When you say the roof has wiring, are you referring to the top being covered in chicken wire/hardware cloth? And then I'm assuming you have 2x4s on top of that, which the galvanized sheet metal is drilled to?
     
  4. Ellie J.

    Ellie J. New Egg

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    May 20, 2017
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  5. Big Daddy Dye

    Big Daddy Dye Just Hatched

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    May 19, 2017
    I live in SE Wisconsin as well and just recently started raising chickens so I'm new to it as well. If you use plywood, would you cover it with something? Like tarpaper or shingles? I looked into corrogated roofing and felt it was way too expensive. So I used plywood and tarpaper and will eventually shingle it. Have fun! I like your design. How many chickens?
     

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  6. Folly's place

    Folly's place Chicken Obsessed

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    southern Michigan
    Welcome!!! I'm in Michigan, and have about five sq. ft. per bird in my coop, which is a walk-in building. My run is covered with a sloped roof, and there's hardware cloth everywhere. Build with snow load in mind! Chicken wire is useless, use hardware cloth, well attached, over every opening larger than 1/2" diameter, and allow for more ventilation and light into the coop. Also, those latches will be easily opened by raccoons; use locks. I started with a very few bantams, and have MANY more birds now, so my coop and run have been enlarged/ improved over the years. Ventilation, adequate space, and predator control are the most important issues, after having a roof over their heads. Mary
     
  7. florachick_

    florachick_ Just Hatched

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    May 17, 2017
    WI
    Your chickens will be happy with all of that space! I'm not going to cover the plywood with anything, just hope that a good quality exterior paint will seal it enough from the elements. I do really like the SunTuf products that Home Depot sells because the coloring is light enough or you can even get clear corrugated roofing to allow light into the coop area... just like Ellie J.'s roofing! Since my coop and run is only 3' wide, I'm thinking it should be affordable.
     
  8. florachick_

    florachick_ Just Hatched

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    May 17, 2017
    WI
    Hi Mary! Yes, new rolls of hardware cloth are already in the garage for them! How did you attach the hardware cloth to the wood? I'm trying to figure out how to securely attach it to the wooden frames I'm building for the run. Also, could you recommend any locks to keep the predators out?
     
  9. Folly's place

    Folly's place Chicken Obsessed

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    Sep 13, 2011
    southern Michigan
    We attached the hardware cloth with 3/4" fence staples, and screwed wood strips over that to secure it, overlapping the hardware cloth. Then on the lower 4' of the run, 2"x4" woven wire fencing too. My doors have exterior locked door knobs. Mary
     
  10. DougVC

    DougVC Just Hatched

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    May 5, 2017
    Central WI
    Hi everyone, we live in central Wisconsin and we just started our flock. We have a 4x6 coop that we used vinyl siding and asphalt shingles with a ridge vent to help with moisture and circulation. As we have not gone through a winter yet I am not sure how that is going to hold up. I have 2 windows in addition to about 3 inches of "soffit" to help with the ventilation. I have not insulated anything but will if I need to. I do have a regular 60 watt light bulb to supply a little heat and I plan to have that on to help with laying production in the winter.

    Regarding the run, I originally stapled (5/8 in staples) the hardware cloth to 2x4s but that did not seem to be solid enough as the staples would pull out randomly, so I decided to rip the 2x4s and then put the hardware cloth between the boards and screwed them back together. That ended being way more secure and also less sharp edges (little kid running around). It actually ended up being easier than the staples as well. Would highly recommend going that route from the start. My run is currently 4x8 and I plan on increasing the size of the run over time.
     
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