The Evolution of Atlas: A Breeding (and Chat) Thread

Discussion in 'Pictures & Stories of My Chickens' started by speckledhen, May 8, 2014.

  1. holm25

    holm25 Jr Chicken Wrangler

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    OK I am just wondering[​IMG]
     
  2. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    You and me both, lol. [​IMG]
     
  3. 1muttsfan

    1muttsfan Overrun With Chickens

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    Cutting and clearing always leave things looking so messy. I still have big brush piles out back where I cleared off the trees where the house, driveway and lane went in 4 years ago. Most of the brush was left in big piles inside the woods though, so it is pretty much out of the way. The back 14 acres was badly overgrown, but 90 percent of it was cleared with the brush hog - I figured if I could knock it over with the bucket of the tractor the brush hog could chop it up :lol:
     
  4. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    The briars, both blackberry and cow vine, had grown up so much, it was painful to try to pick your way through there. With rotting tree tops gone as well as the stumps, DH can just drive the mower over it and keep it cut down. And when I get more guineas in the future, they'll love that area, I bet.
     
  5. 1muttsfan

    1muttsfan Overrun With Chickens

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    I wish my neighbor would get guineas again, his used to come over and hang out during the day - they were quite friendly with me, but far enough away at night that they didn't wake me if they alarmed.

    It was really amazing that the brush hog made it intact through the clearing process. you can knock down and demolish a surprisingly large tree.

    Your view is lovely, but I admit that if I ever move south it will be to someplace where the weather is a lot nicer in the winter than here, it surprises me how similar our weather is with you so many miles south.
     
  6. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    Our "normal" winters are just 1/2" here, some frost there, 1" a month later, 2" on a bad snow day, so those photos were way out of the norm for us. I am at 2000 ft elevation. There are other places a few hundred feet lower than me in the same county that don't get what I get and some a few hundred feet higher, like the big old Watson Mountain in my view, that gets snow when we don't. I can see it on the roofs of the cabins up there on the side of the mtn. It's worth a bit of snow for the cool summer nights we have and generally lower humidity we have in hot weather than folks lower in elevation have. I can't deal with hot weather anymore, being very hot-natured.

    Gosh, I loved my guineas, very tame, but at the time, I had four of them and only ten hens with Hawkeye and they started being brutal to him and the three RIR hens, ONLY the red hens, for some reason only a guinea knows. I had to rehome them, but when I get more, they will live separately and I'll have a larger flock of them so they can have a real guinea society and it should work out better.
     
  7. Peanutsmomma

    Peanutsmomma Chillin' With My Peeps Premium Member

    I have so enjoyed the pics of your land and clearing project.

    Do you think that it will be warm enough today for Rachel to take the babies outside?
     
  8. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    Probably not, not unless it really hits 50*. The ground is very, very wet.
     
  9. MistyMountain

    MistyMountain Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Speaking as a transplant from up north (WI), the winters down south are sooooo much better than up there! The brutal chill to the bone cold for days on end is rare here, and you can actually go outside and do things in the winter!! We do get snow, here and there. Usually about one or two good snows for snowman making or sledding and then two days later it is gone. We got two feet last year, but that was a freak incident. Sometimes it will randomly be 70 degrees in January!! Back in WI, we used to never close school for snow. I do remember having to stay home because it was too cold to go outside, though. They are quicker to cancel school down here, and rightfully so. The mountain roads can be very dangerous when icy.

    Another plus are the views… oh the mountains!!

    I have to ask, though, since it is unheard of down here, how's the ice fishing this year? I tell people here about ice fishing and sturgeon spearing and they look at me like I am crazy. We used to head up to Bay de Noc every winter.

    First thing I learned when I moved down here, though, is that the mountains are pronounced Appa-LATCH-in mountains not Appa-lay-shin!! I still call water fountains bubblers, though!

    Speckledhen, how are the chicks doing? Have you made any more guesses on gender? They are so cute!!
     
  10. 1muttsfan

    1muttsfan Overrun With Chickens

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    The fishing has been good, lots of perch and some walleye. One friend of mine headed up to Emerson on Lake Superior for Whitefish this weekend. There was a fisherman lost through the ice on Little Bay De Noc a week ago - went through the ice when a pressure crack developed under his shanty, he went through in a 4 wheeler. Big water is always dangerous, the unpredictable and strong currents underneath really affect the ice quality. Seems like every few years we loose someone on the ice between here and Mackinac Island.

    I know what you mean about the brutal, unending cold. The girls stayed inside today until the sun came around enough to shine in the pen - 16 degrees right now. Although I would be out running around on the snowmobile if I did not have a touch of flu or some other bug [​IMG]
     

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