Unruley Rooster

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by ingv8700, Jan 6, 2009.

  1. ingv8700

    ingv8700 Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 18, 2008
    Pequot Lakes, MN
    I just have a quick question, I have a rooster that is starting to act up. My boys walk in the coop, and if they make any noise at all, talk to them, make any weird noises, the rooster attacks their legs and at one point, he flew up on my son's back and started screaming. Is there anything that we can do, short of killing him? Is this more of a dominance issue or just more aggressive? They don't do it to me, but just the boys.
     
  2. TaLani

    TaLani ~ Gemini Chick ~

    Oct 2, 2008
    Bryson City, NC
    Probably dominance. We cured ours doing the same thing by bringing our kids in the run with us and watching the roos every movement. When they went at the kids we swatted their butts with a broom. You just have to show them that YOU guys are the boss, not them. The main thing to remember is to be CONSISTENT. It may take a while for them to get the mssg, but they will. If not, rehome them, put an ad on craigslist or freecycle. Ours got the message quite quickly and we don't have a problem now. PM me if you have further questions. [​IMG]
     
  3. Look at Rooster-Reds BYC pages. He has information that will save the life of your roo and make yours much more comfortable.
     
  4. DeeTee

    DeeTee Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 1, 2008
    Desbarats, Ontario
    I can't remember where I read this advice, but it worked for me with my rooster.

    When he acts up, pick him up and tuck him under your arm, football style. Do not put him down until he relaxes and stops struggling; carry him around for awhile if you have to.

    When he's calm put him down while holding his wings to his body. Make sure he is still calm before you lift your hands and let him walk away. DO NOT let him get away from you by struggling. You are asserting that you are in control.

    Good luck!
     
  5. scooter147

    scooter147 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 30, 2008
    Missouri
    Your son needs to show your rooster he is the dominate "rooster" and that means a good butt kicking must be given to the rooster. When he attacks your son, he has to fight back and that means sending the rooster accross the coop with a kick, not too hard as to injury him but a lift and send sailing kick. Then your son needs to go after him pick him up and carry him around by his feet for a while, and repeat as necessary. This has almost always worked for me with a rooster who thinks he is bigger and tougher than me.
     
  6. ingv8700

    ingv8700 Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 18, 2008
    Pequot Lakes, MN
    Thanks for the responses. I had to laugh when one of the boys came in the house hold him upside down saying that he just attacked his leg. He was pretty calm then, and then he went and put him back in the coop and he walked off.
     
  7. Year of the Rooster

    Year of the Rooster Sebright Savvy

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    Jun 27, 2008
    West Central Ohio
    Quote:Be careful with this method. I've heard that if you do that, it can cause problems with the rooster's lungs since they are near their spine. Also, if you choose to do this, DO NOT do it if he has recently ate or else he may choke and die.
     
  8. scooter147

    scooter147 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 30, 2008
    Missouri
    Yep, Year of the Rooster, I agree. That is why I kinda clarified myself with the "lift and sail" method. It is hard to try and described what I mean. I really am not kicking the bird at all. I am just showing/surprising him with my strength. I just place my foot under his breast lift up and forward and the bird comes flapping back to the ground. You can almost see the look on their face, WOW, he is strong I better think twice about attacking him. I hold the rooster by their feet for 30 seconds or so, not long, again to show him I have complete control of him.
     

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