What do you all think about Euthanasia?

Discussion in 'Family Life - Stories, Pictures & Updates' started by oesdog, Jun 19, 2012.

  1. thaiturkey

    thaiturkey Songster

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    Hospices do a wonderful job but the question of legalising euthanasia extends way beyond terminal illness.
     
  2. FuzzyButtsFarm

    FuzzyButtsFarm Rest in Peace 1950-2013

    I realize that, but the point I was trying to make is just because you have a terminal illness there is no reason you have to die in agony if that's what a person is afraid of. I also saw the PBS special on Sweedens assisted suicide. It's to bad that in the US, that touts freedoms, we are not allowed that choice.
     
  3. Mattemma

    Mattemma Crowing

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    People should have the right to die.They need to prepare for this early legally.Shame people are forced to suffer till their bodies give out.Why do we feel ok putting an animal out of misery,but we prefer to drug humans in misery?Why?If they want to end it they should be supported in that choice.
     
  4. thaiturkey

    thaiturkey Songster

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    As a matter of interest, do you think that suicide should be legalised for everyone? If not, where should the line be between permissible and not permissible? should any method of suicide be legal?
     
  5. I've just got to ask; If someone succeeds at committing suicide, who do you arrest? Seems to me that all of these laws forbidding suicide are only enforceable if you fail in your attempt.
     
  6. Stacykins

    Stacykins Crowing

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    An important thing to note, is that having a living will is very important to ensure you have a voice, if for some reason you cannot speak up. Like, if you were in a persistent vegetative state or brain dead. Essentially, you make your decision before it happens. I know being taken off life support isn't 'suicide' but it is somewhat similar.

    Though the scary thing here in Michigan...even if you HAVE a living will, immediate family can override it. It isn't legally recognized here (but it is in most places), unless you have zero family and it is the only document they have. So if you come from a family that will keep you alive at all costs, appointing a power of attorney is the only way you can ensure your wishes are met. I know my father only wants to be kept 'alive' for 30 days, and my mother 60 days. By then you know if a case is medically futile, that there is no chance of recovery.
     
  7. thaiturkey

    thaiturkey Songster

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    The issue for many people is why, in countries where suicide is no longer a crime, is assisted suicide illegal in the sense that the assistants may be charged with murder?

    There's a case before the High Court in London awaiting a decision very soon:

    16 August 2012 Last updated at 03:34 GMT
    Tony Nicklinson: Right-to-die court decision due

    By James Gallagher Health and science reporter, BBC News
    [​IMG] Tony Nicklinson was paralysed by a stroke in 2005

    A man paralysed from the neck down is to find out later whether his doctors will be free from prosecution if they help him to die.

    Tony Nicklinson, 58, from Melksham, Wiltshire, communicates by blinking and has described his life as a "living nightmare" since a stroke in 2005. His High Court case goes further than past challenges to laws in England and Wales on assisted suicide and murder. Any ruling is expected to be subject to an appeal.

    'Misery'

    Father-of-two Mr Nicklinson was left paralysed with locked-in syndrome after a catastrophic stroke while on a business trip to Athens. He was unable to attend court for the four-day hearing in June because of his complicated care needs. In an email he said: "Legal arguments are fine but they should not forget that a life is affected by the decision they come to. A decision going against me condemns me to a 'life' of increasing misery."

    The case differs from other "right-to-die" cases which have focused on assisted suicide. Mr Nicklinson would be unable to take lethal drugs, even if they were prepared by someone else. For someone else to kill him would amount to murder.

    In June, his barrister Paul Bowen QC told the High Court: "Tony has now had almost seven years to contemplate his situation. With the continuing benefits of 21st Century health and social care his life expectancy can be expected to be normal - another 20 years or more. He does not wish to live that life." Mr Bowen added: "The claimant, who has made a voluntary, clear, settled and informed wish to end his own life with dignity, is too disabled to do so. The current law of assisted suicide and euthanasia operate to prevent him from adopting the only means by which he could practically end his life, namely with medical assistance."

    'Untenable'

    David Perry QC, who is representing the Ministry of Justice, said Mr Nicklinson's "tragic and very distressing circumstances evoke the deepest sympathy". "Notwithstanding the distressing facts of his situation, the defendant submits that the claim for declarations is untenable. The law is well established," he added.

    The case is being contested on the issue of "necessity" arguing that the only way to end Mr Nicklinson's suffering is to allow him to die. This was used in 2000 when conjoined twins were separated, saving one even though doctors knew the other would die. Mr Nicklinson's team will also argue that his case is covered by Article 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights which deals with the right to respect for private and family life.

    The judges will also publish a determination in the case of another paralysed man with locked-in syndrome, named only as Martin, who is 47. Part of his case involves a challenge to the Director of Public Prosecution's policy on assisted suicide.
     
  8. Another viewpoint:

    My body, my self. I am not the property of THE STATE! I will make the decisions concerning my life no matter if I live in the U.S., the UK, or 27 miles SSE of BFE.

    I, for one am tired of being "meddled" with. Walk, don't run! Don't smoke cigarettes. Stay out of the sun. Don't drive over 55 miles-per-hour. Don't inhale glue. (Actually, I agree with that one, but I may change my mind sometime in the future.) Avoid gluten. (What the hell is "gluten"? Millions of generations have survived without that information.) See your dentist once a year. Get a high colonic. (I'll pass.) Reduce your bad cholesterol. Increase your good cholesterol. (Once again, millions of generations of man...) Watch out for elephants in case a circus comes to town. (Just checking to see if your still reading. [​IMG]) Remain active. Don't overdo. Wash your hands every chance you get. Don't carry cash.
    Buy local. Keep hydrated. Conserve water. Avoid caffeine. Avoid sugar. Lose weight. Don't be anorexic. The list is endless.

    Get my point? My life is mine to prolong or end as I see fit. Leave me alone! [​IMG]
     
    1 person likes this.
  9. thaiturkey

    thaiturkey Songster

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    No, I don't get your point.

    The man mentioned in my last post was fit and active until he had a stroke. Until then, he could have committed suicide if he chose to. Now his quality of life is very poor and he wants out but cannot do it himself. If someone helps hi they could be on a murder charge.

    Get my point?
     
  10. And my point was and still is that he can communicate and wishes his suffering ended. By what right does the state say that his wishes are not to be followed? The nanny state strikes again.
     

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