Adopted by a single Guinea - Need Advise

OhDebra

In the Brooder
Dec 2, 2019
9
22
16
Hello - I did not have chickens - I just got adopted by a single Guinea, I live just outside of town on a rectangle 3 acres - deep lot. About 2 weeks ago a Guinea chicken showed up. Running around franticly all over screaming and sometimes in circles. Up and down the street to the neighbors houses. Got on my roof and screeching from there. Kind of remind of a peacock. Every time I went outside that poor thing went crazy.

Well now the Guinea has settled down and mostly stays in my yard. I have a brick house with tall windows - sometimes it purchase in a window to sleep. Never any damage, so I don't chase it off. I have 4 cats, indoor cats but they have a large cage outside on the patio with shelves. I would like to know if anyone has any suggestions on how to cokes the Guinea in there for shelter? I have left the door open and placed some feed in there. It is starting to get used to seeing me. I want the Guinea to survive and do what I can for it. I have made sure there is water out there and some chicken food if it wants.

Anyone have any suggestions? I can not just pretend I do not know it is there and winter is coming on fast!

Thank you

Debra
 

Henry&Friends

Songster
May 6, 2018
461
1,057
186
The guinea will scream nonstop— I wish I knew that before I got any. Mine have been handled and raised with chickens, and are still too skittish to go near. It probably won’t let you get near it, or go into your house or cage willingly. If you chase it off, it’ll roost up in a tree or something else. So I would just let it keep doing it’s thing, if it gets too cold maybe open the window and it’ll come in? :confused:
 

HeyHeyWW

Songster
Oct 9, 2017
167
446
136
Florida
I've never had a guinea chicken before. I do know that they are always so noisy, so it's normal for it to be screaming and running around like that. I don't think you'll ever be able to catch it, though, so you won't be able to get it in a cage. If it's not sheltered at night, it could get eaten by some raccoon or possum if you have any where you live.

I'm not sure what you should do if it gets too cold. How cold does it usually get in the winters where you live? I live in Florida and temperatures only go down to maybe 30-40 degrees Fahrenheit. That is fine for them. My chickens have survived that temperature just fine. I'm worried if it gets really cold wherever you live, because it could actually die from the cold. :/ I wouldn't want that to happen to it.

So maybe try what Henry&Friends suggested. Leave a window open and it might come into your house.
 

Henry&Friends

Songster
May 6, 2018
461
1,057
186
So maybe try what Henry&Friends suggested. Leave a window open and it might come into your house.
that’s a last resort option though— I wouldn’t want one of those things flipping out all over my house! :oops:

As long as it isn’t too cold out, you can toss it some food in the morning and it’ll forage for food & roost somewhere at night. Something might’ve happened to its flock :confused: are we sure it’s a guinea hen? It’s really hard to sex them, the best way to sex them is to listen to their screaming, I think a hen does one syllable and a cock does two.
 

OhDebra

In the Brooder
Dec 2, 2019
9
22
16
The guinea will scream nonstop— I wish I knew that before I got any. Mine have been handled and raised with chickens, and are still too skittish to go near. It probably won’t let you get near it, or go into your house or cage willingly. If you chase it off, it’ll roost up in a tree or something else. So I would just let it keep doing it’s thing, if it gets too cold maybe open the window and it’ll come in? :confused:
Love that - open the window....LOL - You are confirming my thinking - just provide what I can and let Guinea do it's thing. It has stopped screeching and all just hangs out now. Not running away like it did at first. But I place food out and water and call it Guinea so it gets familiar with me.
 

OhDebra

In the Brooder
Dec 2, 2019
9
22
16
that’s a last resort option though— I wouldn’t want one of those things flipping out all over my house! :oops:

As long as it isn’t too cold out, you can toss it some food in the morning and it’ll forage for food & roost somewhere at night. Something might’ve happened to its flock :confused: are we sure it’s a guinea hen? It’s really hard to sex them, the best way to sex them is to listen to their screaming, I think a hen does one syllable and a cock does two.
LOL - I got a laugh out of that comment. I would hide under the chair too! I read they mate for life? I thought about checking the area to see if there is a farmer in the area that raises them but that would not do me much good if I can not catch it. I have hear that chickens are easer to. handle at night? Is this true? I notice that in the morning at day break that the Guinea is slow to get up and appears sluggish.

I do not know the sex - now that it is not screaming can you tell by looks? I know it is a Guinea by the pictures on the web. It likes the food I got from Tractor Supply too. I have a heated bowl for a dog I will place out when it gets colder.
 

OhDebra

In the Brooder
Dec 2, 2019
9
22
16
I've never had a guinea chicken before. I do know that they are always so noisy, so it's normal for it to be screaming and running around like that. I don't think you'll ever be able to catch it, though, so you won't be able to get it in a cage. If it's not sheltered at night, it could get eaten by some raccoon or possum if you have any where you live.

I'm not sure what you should do if it gets too cold. How cold does it usually get in the winters where you live? I live in Florida and temperatures only go down to maybe 30-40 degrees Fahrenheit. That is fine for them. My chickens have survived that temperature just fine. I'm worried if it gets really cold wherever you live, because it could actually die from the cold. :/ I wouldn't want that to happen to it.

So maybe try what Henry&Friends suggested. Leave a window open and it might come into your house.
Well it is 35 out right now. I am in northern Ohio and it gets cold. There are many places around the house here for the Guinea to hide and get out of the wind and weather right now but when that snow flies and it several feet deep I have another large cage in the garage that can be temporary if need be, but catching it LOL without opening the window the best LOL. I have hear that chickens are easer to handle at night? Is this true? if so I could maybe place a see through tote over it if it is on the patio to get it to a better place. ???
 

TwoShepherds

Crowing
Apr 4, 2019
467
2,374
277
Southeast TN
If it's eating food, you can probably put some food in a live trap and lure it in that way. You can buy traps in our local farm store. You might even be able to rent one. My family rented a live trap from the local SPCA once to catch a stray cat, but that was years ago, don't know if they still do that.

I don't think guineas are meant to be solitary. If it were me, and I chose to take responsibility for the guinea, I'd either try to catch and rehome it, or I'd get a coop and add some more guineas or chickens. I think once you catch it, you may be able to get it accustumed to sleeping in a certain place by locking it there for several weeks to a month. The guinea people should be able to tell you for sure. I don't have guineas, but I have read up on them a little bit because I think they're really interesting.

Good luck, and whatever you decide, and however much or little you opt to do, you're awesome for helping. Keep us updated! :)
 
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OhDebra

In the Brooder
Dec 2, 2019
9
22
16
If it's eating food, you can probably put some food in a live trap and lure it in that way. You can buy traps in our local farm store. You might even be able to rent one. My family rented a live trap from the local SPCA once to catch a stray cat, but that was years ago, don't know if they still do that.

I don't think guineas are meant to be solitary. If it were me, and I chose to take responsibility for the guinea, I'd either try to catch and rehome it, or I'd get a coop and add some more guineas or chickens. I think once you catch it, you may be able to get it accustumed to sleeping in a certain place by locking it there for several weeks to a month. The guinea people should be able to tell you for sure. I don't have guineas, but I have read up on them a little bit because I think they're really interesting.

Good luck, and whatever you decide, and however much or little you opt to do, you're awesome for helping. Keep us updated! :)
Thank you solid advise! I agree on trying to rehome it. I know I can find someone in the area that has chickens if not Guineas even. I have large enough cages and such to maintain the Guinea for a short time while I find it a home.

Our lot is long and narrow and have neighbors on both sides, when we first came here there were alone, city is coming our way. Neighbor on one side I think would not tolarate chickens in her yard, other would not complain. I keep my cats in a cage when outside so they are not bothering people, eating birds and getting hurt.

Everything I have read said they are not solitary as well, so we both have the same understanding.
 

Unicornlife3316

Songster
Apr 21, 2018
337
639
186
Bryan, TX
Ok first — it’s not a guinea chicken, it’s either a Guinea Hen (female makes a two syllable buckwheat sounding call) or a Guinea Cock (males make a three syllable very shrill call)

Second - it did probably lose its flock one way or another, they are miserable alone, should not be raised with chickens because of their breeding practices, they can get very aggressive and rough with chickens, even mine that WERE NOT raised with chickens still like to sneak up on my chickens and pull a feather. They’re kind of jerks. They prefer flocks of 10 or more to be happy.

Third - dear god don’t open a window. I could NOT imagine having one of my Guineas in my house. They’d break everything, freak the everything you kNow what out. Best to build a cage, lure it with treats (meal worms, white millet, something it likes, may take trial and error) - the one thing you’re right about is being easier to handle at night, they’re completely blind, so if you got it in a contained area, theoretically you might be able to grab it, watch the beak and toenails, they’re sharp as knives.

If you do manage to catch it, please find someone with a flock to regime it - but honestly, if it’s being left in the elements and doesn’t have shelter, don’t expect it to last long.

@R2elk... care to add if I missed anything?
 
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