Coccidiosis in Adult Hen? Help!

May 29, 2019
325
410
141
Southwest VA
All 7 of my chickens are 15 months old and appear healthy (visually)--eating, drinking, moving around, etc. However I noticed a small amount of gelatinous blood in two small wet poops (kinda discharge-y looking) presumably from one of my birds. Looked more like blood than intestinal lining, which I had seen before. Tons of other healthy looking poops.

I'm still determining the culprit, but: is blood in stool ALWAYS cocci, even in an adult hen? If not what else could it be? I'm thinking I need to treat the flock with Corid, however I'd like to find the culprit in case antibiotics are needed to treat enteritis. Please let me know your thoughts!

P.S. chickens were dewormed with safeguard a few weeks back, 5 days in a row. Neighbors new flock of pullets has been free ranging in our area, so our chickens have been sharing turf.
 

azygous

Crossing the Road
10 Years
Dec 11, 2009
20,139
25,585
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Colorado Rockies
You can find out if your flock has coccidiosis by dropping off a random stool sample to your vet and ask for a fecal float test for coccidia. It helps if you are a client of the vet and they know you since most vets don't want to deal with chickens. Assure them you will handle the treatment. The test takes about an hour and is relatively inexpensive.

I would treat the entire flock. You might be able to pinpoint the one with the bloody stools by noting where each chicken is on the roost, draw a diagram, then you can match up the overnight droppings in the morning.
 
May 29, 2019
325
410
141
Southwest VA
Well I thought I had the culprit narrowed down to 2 of 7 then they proceeded to present with tons of normal looking stools. This morning they each left a weird one--a green pudding looking one that seemed (and smelled) like cecal, and a more foamy peanut buttery yellow one that also seemed like it could be just cecal.

The other four have all been laying beautiful, normal poops. And I haven't seen anything resembling blood nor intestinal lining from all 7 since the small one I saw last night.

Still move ahead with whole flock corid? Everyone is eating, drinking, and energetic. I feel like such a weirdo stalking them for poop--thatd typically my dog's job.

You can find out if your flock has coccidiosis by dropping off a random stool sample to your vet and ask for a fecal float test for coccidia. It helps if you are a client of the vet and they know you since most vets don't want to deal with chickens. Assure them you will handle the treatment. The test takes about an hour and is relatively inexpensive.

I would treat the entire flock. You might be able to pinpoint the one with the bloody stools by noting where each chicken is on the roost, draw a diagram, then you can match up the overnight droppings in the morning.
 

azygous

Crossing the Road
10 Years
Dec 11, 2009
20,139
25,585
982
Colorado Rockies
If you can't get a vet to run a stool sample for coccidia, then by all means treat your flock with Corid. Recently, I saw some suspect poop from my youngest flock members, chicks from one-week to thirteen weeks, and I wasted no time in treating them. There was no reason not to. It's just so simple to give them the Corid water each day, and it requires no more thought or action than that. I figure if they didn't have it, not a biggie since Corid is merely a vitamin B blocker. And if they did have the start of coccidiosis, I saved some lives.
 
May 29, 2019
325
410
141
Southwest VA
If you can't get a vet to run a stool sample for coccidia, then by all means treat your flock with Corid. Recently, I saw some suspect poop from my youngest flock members, chicks from one-week to thirteen weeks, and I wasted no time in treating them. There was no reason not to. It's just so simple to give them the Corid water each day, and it requires no more thought or action than that. I figure if they didn't have it, not a biggie since Corid is merely a vitamin B blocker. And if they did have the start of coccidiosis, I saved some lives.
Got it. Thank you. Going to take fecals in for good measure but just went ahead and started them on Corid to be safe. Any other recommendations to help give them a boost alongside the Corid?
 

Gracelovessilkiechickens

In the Brooder
Aug 7, 2020
33
31
36
I have seen some bloody poop in my coop and am treating with the water soluble Corid. The chickens are eating and drinking. They are out and about in the yard now, so I think I caught it early. Do you guys think I’ve got good odds here?
 

azygous

Crossing the Road
10 Years
Dec 11, 2009
20,139
25,585
982
Colorado Rockies
Corid is such an easy, benign treatment, it should be undertaken at the first glimmer of suspicion of coccidiosis. That is usually noticing unusual poop. If you start the Corid before you notice behavior indications, you're going to easily beat coccidiosis.
 

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