Cream Legbar Hybrid Thread

Katazynaa

In the Brooder
May 9, 2018
12
18
34
Hansen, Idaho
Each image has only what the wording above the image says. The first image is of chicks from Rose Comb Leghorn hens crossed with a Cream Legbar rooster. The second image is of Sapphires which are an F1 hybrid created by crossing White Leghorn hens with a Cream Legbar rooster. The third image are from Sapphire hens crossed with a Cream Legbar rooster.

It is very common for many of the Sapphires to have some random black spots. The Sapphires are not auto sexing. The Sapphire/Legbar cross did produce some but not all auto sexing chicks.

The Rose Comb Leghorn/Legbar crosses were not auto sexing but when they were crossed back with the Cream Legbar the next generation were all auto sexing.
Thank you so much for the clarification! I just got some legbar (assuming it's a cream) over a leghorn (not sure on the comb) she had no idea why they look the way they do. I was surprised myself not knowing anything. Just that sexlinks tend to have the dot on their head. Here is a picture of them. Some very wide barring. Almost looks like stripes.
IMG_20180830_150019509.jpg
IMG_20180830_150012448.jpg
 

R2elk

Free Ranger
Premium member
6 Years
Feb 24, 2013
12,118
38,388
1,131
Natrona County, Wyoming
Thank you so much for the clarification! I just got some legbar (assuming it's a cream) over a leghorn (not sure on the comb) she had no idea why they look the way they do. I was surprised myself not knowing anything. Just that sexlinks tend to have the dot on their head. Here is a picture of them. Some very wide barring. Almost looks like stripes.View attachment 1520337 View attachment 1520338
The ones with the big head spot are very likely cockerels but that does not mean that the others are pullets.
 

The Moonshiner

Professional Chicken Tender
Nov 17, 2016
4,901
11,126
481
Missouri
If I crossed a Single barred rooster that came from a DBL barred rooster with a CLB would that produce a auto sexed chick?
1/4 of them would be. Another 1/4 maybe and 1/2 wouldn't be.
Your cross would produce single and double barred males and barred and nonbarred females.
Of course any nonbarred (no headspots) chicks you would know where females.
If you're lucky you would be able to tell double barred males from the single barred ones and know they're males.
That leaves barred females and single barred males that would look alike.
It really depends on the color pattern of the rooster. If he's barred duckwing like a CCL then the double barred males would have diluted pattern which would be a big help. If he was black and throw a lot of black chicks you'd only have headshots to go by which wouldn't be as easy. Or if he was something that throw mostly yellow or buff chicks you would have trouble identifying any headspots. Then of course he could throw a variety of patterned chicks which would make things real interesting.
 
Last edited:

gunslinger33

Songster
Feb 3, 2018
242
203
103
Thank you Moonshiner. Would the result be the same if I used a rooster that came from my same single barrred rooster out of a single barred hen? So I would have a rooster used from both parents that were single barred but also carried the double barring ?
 

The Moonshiner

Professional Chicken Tender
Nov 17, 2016
4,901
11,126
481
Missouri
Thank you Moonshiner. Would the result be the same if I used a rooster that came from my same single barrred rooster out of a single barred hen? So I would have a rooster used from both parents that were single barred but also carried the double barring ?
Barring is sex linked hence why it works for auto sexing or sex links.
What you see is what you have. They can't carry a second barred gene sight unseen. It also doesn't matter if a single barred bird came from a single or double barred parent.
Females can only have one gene for barring. So they're either barred or not. They can only pass their barring gene to male offspring. Female offspring get nothing in barring from their mothers.
Males get or don't get one gene from each parent. That's how they can be single or double barred.
For sex links you need a non barred male over barred hens.
For auto sexing you need double barred males over barred females.
Your single barred male is in between what you need when breeding to the barred hen.
One too many barred genes for 100% sex links and one to few for producing 100% auto sexing.
He would produce the 1/4 that are known female sex links. With the right combo 1/4 that were auto sex males. Then the other 1//2 would be neither auto sexing or sex links.
 

HaplessRunner

Songster
6 Years
Feb 8, 2013
983
117
161
Boston, VA
Entries to Date for Fourth Annual Cream Legbar Club Online, Virtual Show

As of December 6, 2018:

Cream Legbars: 14 cockerels and 14 pullets
Golden Crele Legbars: 1 cock, 3 cockerels, and 2 pullets
White Legbars: 1 cockerel and 1 pullet

Your hens and cocks should be coming out of their annual molts and growing new feathers for the winter. Please get your pictures taken! The online show is open until December 22, 2018.

Happy Holidays to all from the Cream Legbar Club!
:)
 

PupsNHens

Songster
Sep 19, 2017
113
107
116
N. Texas
These are my two offspring from a Blue Orpington over a Cream Legbar cross. My Cream Legbar hen doesn't have much of a crest, and apparently didn't pass it on. The pullet just started laying olive eggs :yesss: (I was considering adding an olive-egger to my little flock and now I have one).

As chicks, the pullet was the blackest chick - feet, legs, beak were all black. She now has the black-green sheen, pink earlobes, and my Cream Legbar's tail/tail set.
true2122018.PNG

The cockerel looked black at first, but got lighter with age. And you can just see the head spot in the photo below. He has a golden tone to his barred feathers and those very pick earlobes. I suspect the white in his tail is from the Blue Orp. This boy was crowing at 3 days old!
uno2018a.png
 

GaryDean26

Chicken Czar
8 Years
Dec 22, 2011
1,824
861
271
McAlester, OK
My Coop
My Coop
I bred Black Copper Marans for 5-6 years the really black chicks were always a clear sign that we had a recessive color pattern [e+, eb, or eWh]. Your Orpington is build on the extended black [E] primary color pattern and cross with a legbar will have the Extended Black [E] with a recessive Wild type [e+] and should have a really black chick down color. Your cross was a success. Everything came out as it should have. Congratulations. The Oliver Eggs are great additions to the flock.
 

Latest posts

Top Bottom