How Humane Are No-Crow Rooster Collars?

HannahL

Chirping
Jan 11, 2018
60
52
88
Thanks so much for all the replies. I realize that roosters crow and I knew that going into it. However, in this case getting the rooster was quite unexpected. He was at a kill shelter and I managed to nab him before he was sent to become soup. I figured that a collar was better than being killed for him. I realize that it is preventing the rooster from doing what is natural for him. I more meant, is it going to hurt him? If it’s just a bit embarrassing for him, I can live with that. If it actually hurts him, that’s a different story. And if anyone has any other ideas of preventing crowing besides a collar that’d be greatly appreciated. Thanks!
 

gimmie birdies

Crowing
6 Years
Feb 12, 2013
7,842
4,476
472
Eastern WA
They say no roosters in our HOA after living here with roosters for 25 years on 2 acres. I take that as a no crow policy. I have my roosters wear crow collars, and if it was choking them they would be dead. I make sure I can put my finger between the collar and their neck. The collar is uncomfortable, and probably feels weird on their neck so they won't crow, but the choice of having no life or a life with a collar, and 15 hens to service, what guy would not want to wear a collar? *with the collar they still crow- i.e. still happy, just not as loud.
 

The Moonshiner

Professional Chicken Tender
Nov 17, 2016
4,876
11,073
481
Missouri
What if someone told you from now on when you talk it has to be in a whisper.
It's either that or you will be put to death. I'm sure that kinda life wouldn't kill you and wouldn't cause you any pain but is it a life you want to live?
That will be your roosters best case scenario.
Truth is collars do restrict air flow. To much restriction and they die. To little restriction and it does nothing to lessen the volume. Just right and it restricts enough to quiet the crow but not enough to kill them.
Then you have the concern of the chock hazard. Being caught or hung on something or trying to swallow something to large.
If you read their sites you will see how much emphasis is put on correctly fitting the collar and most have a warning against feeding pellet style food. When the manufacturer puts that information out there doesn't that make you think there's some serious risks involved?
I'm sure the majority of people that use them and follow the fitting instructions correctly will never end up with a dead rooster but then there are cases where that's exactly what they end up with. How you gonna feel if you end up the unlucky one?
I was half joking about the living life with only being able to whisper but what if that was your life but then you discovered if I move down the road I'll be able to talk normally again. Would you head down the road or say na no big deal I'll stay here?
Let your rooster move down the road. There are cases where a rooster can be rehomed and not eatened.
 

The Moonshiner

Professional Chicken Tender
Nov 17, 2016
4,876
11,073
481
Missouri
Here's a bit about the respiratory system of a chicken. It's not rocket science to see how the collars reduce the volume of crowing. Expelling air is used for crowing. Limiting how much air they can expel limits the volume of the crowing.
This will explain and show how it all works. You can decide for yourself what effects limiting that air flow is having on a bird and what else it may be effecting then make your own choice on whether it's worth it to you.

The main job of the respiratory system of birds is to absorb oxygen and rid the body of carbon dioxide. In addition, the respiratory system also gets rid of excess heat, detoxifies some of the waste products of the body, and makes noise — most noticeably, crowing noise, much to the annoyance of our neighbors.

Like humans, birds have a windpipe and two lungs, but from there, birds are distinctly unlike mammals. Air flows into a bird’s lungs during the intake of breath, it continues through the lungs into nine air sacks and then it goes back out through the lungs again.

Birds get two doses of oxygen for the price of one breath! The air sacs are arranged around the inside of the chest and abdominal cavity, and they connect with some of the bones of the skeleton.



Humans breathe with the help of the diaphragm muscle, which divides the chest and abdominal cavities. Birds don’t have a working diaphragm; instead, a bird moves its rib cage and keel (breastbone) to draw air into the lungs and force it back out.
 

The Moonshiner

Professional Chicken Tender
Nov 17, 2016
4,876
11,073
481
Missouri
And still the phararoh was hardened. You didn't read mine, and I didn't read yours.
That post was for the OP and anyone else that wants to understand how a birds respiratory system works and how the collar effects that.
I actually did read yours and from this statement alone...
But roosters like to fluff out their hackles as the crow, and that is what I am preventing.
It shows you have no idea what crowing involves or what the collars are doing if you think the collars are to prevent them from fluffing up their hackles which in turn reduces their crowing.
 

PennyM16

Songster
Nov 14, 2018
254
634
161
the chicken coop
And still the phararoh was hardened. You didn't read mine, and I didn't read yours.
Sorry if I am getting myself involved when I shouldnt, but there is no need to be hostile- the chickens are what matter here, and I believe @The Moonshiner was simply informing you, or anyone else, who might not fully understand crowing, chicken respitory system etc. Personally, I found the post quite informative..

(Fyi I'm not "taking sides" I just hate to see people be rude when there isn't reason to, and when it is the chickens we are talking about here)
 

HannahL

Chirping
Jan 11, 2018
60
52
88
I remember that thread @ChickNanny13 . The only problem I could see coming across would be the rooster getting hung up on something accidentally.

I've also read a thread or two about blackout curtains and what not in the coop so the rooster doesn't realize the sun has risen.
What if someone told you from now on when you talk it has to be in a whisper.
It's either that or you will be put to death. I'm sure that kinda life wouldn't kill you and wouldn't cause you any pain but is it a life you want to live?
That will be your roosters best case scenario.
Truth is collars do restrict air flow. To much restriction and they die. To little restriction and it does nothing to lessen the volume. Just right and it restricts enough to quiet the crow but not enough to kill them.
Then you have the concern of the chock hazard. Being caught or hung on something or trying to swallow something to large.
If you read their sites you will see how much emphasis is put on correctly fitting the collar and most have a warning against feeding pellet style food. When the manufacturer puts that information out there doesn't that make you think there's some serious risks involved?
I'm sure the majority of people that use them and follow the fitting instructions correctly will never end up with a dead rooster but then there are cases where that's exactly what they end up with. How you gonna feel if you end up the unlucky one?
I was half joking about the living life with only being able to whisper but what if that was your life but then you discovered if I move down the road I'll be able to talk normally again. Would you head down the road or say na no big deal I'll stay here?
Let your rooster move down the road. There are cases where a rooster can be rehomed and not eatened.
Thank you so much for replying! I found your diagram to be super helpful. Who knew that they got two breaths for the price of one? Pretty cool! Unfortunately, I live in an area that doesn’t have a particular love of roosters. (I’ll never understand why. I think that roosters get a bad rap.) I can’t find many shelters around me that don’t end up sending their roosters to slaughter if they don’t get adopted and I really don’t want that for this guy. He’s so sweet. Do you think it’d be okay if I only kept the collar on at night? He’s remarkably quiet during the rest of the day so he really would only need it on for those first couple early hours of the morning. I’m gonna try blackout curtains in the coop and see if that helps since it seems like the light triggers his crowing. But if the curtains don’t work, do you think that just having it on for a little while in the morning is an okay option? I would hate to give him up if I can prevent it, but I also don’t want to put his safety in danger. Thanks again for your reply!
 

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