Irresponsible neighbor and his roaming chickens

Discussion in 'Local Chicken Laws & Ordinances' started by chickeneighbor, Mar 15, 2019.

  1. Acre4Me

    Acre4Me Crowing

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    From earlier in the thread:

    Yes, there are some states where it is your responsibility to keep animals OUT. Majority of US seems to be Fence IN your animals. Since we don't know where OP is from, who knows if they are in a fence IN or fence OUT state.
     
  2. MochaDuck

    MochaDuck Songster

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    I'm not saying that the OP is being a troll. But IF they are, at least there are already some suggestions here for people who do have this problem
    :)
     
  3. centrarchid

    centrarchid Free Ranging

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    Maybe in future threads like this, the OP needs to indicate specific locality, so laws in effect can be considered immediately. Greater effort is needed to control impulses for opinions as the discussion progresses. It is also the OP's responsibility to respond in a timely manner even when discussion does not align with preconceived notions. Sometimes what is regarded as hostility is actually little more than statements that differ from one's opinions.
     
  4. ijon

    ijon Songster

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    i think that is a little silly. Is it your responsibly to keep a bull out of your property? I had this happen and was injured from the neighbor’s bull.
     
  5. Acre4Me

    Acre4Me Crowing

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    Silly or not, it is what it is. If you are in a Fence OUT state, then you need to fence out that bull. However, if you are in a fence IN state, then look up the laws as there are specifics about animals that get loose, when they should have been contained. If you do not like the laws (whatever they are), then you can try to change them.
     
    Kris5902 likes this.
  6. ijon

    ijon Songster

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    A bull a dog, a stallion. It’s your responsibility to keep them where they are supposed to be.
     
    ShannonR likes this.
  7. Acre4Me

    Acre4Me Crowing

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    Lol. I get it. However, the laws differ according to locale with most being Fence IN. Do you know what YOUR local fence laws are?
     
    Kris5902 likes this.
  8. Shamo Hybrid

    Shamo Hybrid Songster

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    One of my chickens flew into the neighbors property which have horses and sometimes they let the dog roam around. IF my dumb chicken was to get eaten by the dog or horse, would the neighbor be responsible in compensating me for the loss? Thankfully nothing happened to him except for a bit of electrocution from the fence when he decided he had enough fun with the horses.
     
    ShannonR likes this.
  9. BarredRockMom

    BarredRockMom Songster

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    Well, I don't know about anyone else, but if the OP hasn't responded back by now except for the one time in response to being called a possible troll for not posting ANYTHING in terms of an update (which c'mon, am I the only one who's thinking "grow a set"?) I have to say that I'm done. The only sad part about hearing these kinds of crickets is that I can't catch them & offer up a chicken feast.

    Next.
     
    ChooksNQuilts, Kris5902 and Acre4Me like this.
  10. Kris5902

    Kris5902 Crowing

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    Yes... fence out vs fence in laws! Did you know that there’s places where if you fail to fence out your neighbors Bull, and he impregnates your cows, you could be charged a stud fee? However if you put up a fence, and he destroys it to get at your cows in heat, the bulls owner is then on the hook for the damages? The myriad laws regarding livestock are varied and interesting. And have Nothing to do with leash laws or pets. You can not compare the two unilaterally.
     

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