***OKIES in the BYC III ***

Discussion in 'Where am I? Where are you!' started by Buckguy20, May 9, 2011.

  1. old*cowboy

    old*cowboy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    So what all are you selling?
     
  2. Buster52

    Buster52 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Geronimo Oklahoma
    Hey, Cowboy.
     
  3. Poco Pollo

    Poco Pollo Vista de Nada Farm

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    Do you have any dummy eggs? I leave a couple painted plaster eggs in each nest, and my hens have quit laying in the yard. It's nice to collect clean eggs from just one place in each pen. If you have some plaster of paris, you can make your own. All you need to do is blow out half a dozen duck eggs, put a piece of tape over the hole in the pointy ends, and pour plaster into the big ends. The plaster will settle a little, so you can top off your eggs to make them rounder. You can also shave or sand down the ends after you take the shells off. I paint mine with non-toxic latex paint, three coats, and they last a long time. The ducks don't seem to be able to tell the fake from the real eggs. If you have any trouble telling, you can always mark your fake eggs and put the mark down into the nest so the hens won't see it. I tried plastic Easter Eggs, but the hens weren't fooled.

    Edited to add: I did leave the shell on one, sealed the holes with wax, and painted the shell. The shell separated from the plaster as the plaster shrunk a little, and it cracked in several places.
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2012
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  5. NanaKat

    NanaKat Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

    Wow...everyone has been busy today on the site!

    Babysat the two youngest grandsons today for a few hours so daughter could meet with the home builder to finalize the flooring and paint on the new house. She also got some free time to meet with a few friends for a birthday luncheon. Those little boys are on the go all the time!

    Ginger is on a roll...she laid her third egg!
     
  6. nnbreeder

    nnbreeder Chillin' With My Peeps

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    My first try would be a spray of soapy water. The soap is an emulsifier which makes water wetter. It will allow the water to not form droplets on the bugs and essentially they drown because they can't shed the water, or breathe.

    Garlic spray would also be a good premise spray as would Bordeaux mix for the outside of the chicken area.

    Here are some more ideas that can be applied to the area around the birds.

    http://esperanceholisticfarm.com/?q=node/28

    I have a friend down South that uses red Cayenne peppers finely ground for worm control. Birds don't have the receptors for hot in their mouths and ya'll know how they like red. just sprinkle a little over their feed weekly. He butchers a few birds every now and then and is curious enough to go looking for worms and swears he has never found any.

    The best defense against the Northern Fowl Mite is caulking and glue. Glue all joints when building a coop or nest boxes or whatever and in older construction caulk all cracks. These mites are the most common and will come out at night to feed and then either drop down into the bedding or go back into a crack after taking a blood meal. The Northerns are tiny and hard to see, they are actually nearly clear until they feed and then they are red.
     
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  8. nnbreeder

    nnbreeder Chillin' With My Peeps

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    The Pekins that we had would lay nearly as good as the Campbells but they did lay a clutch and then take a break, did it all summer long.
     
  9. Coral, How hard would it be to make ceramic eggs and fire them in the kiln?
    I wouldn't think it would take much clay if you made them hollow
     
  10. mjgigax

    mjgigax Overrun With Chickens

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    If I remember right from my ceramics classes, they would have to be hollow and have a small hole in them or they would blow up in the kiln.
     

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