Palestinian Farmer

In the Brooder
Oct 21, 2018
10
24
34
Hello everybody, I just had a crazy idea, and I wanted to run it through you guys:-

Introduction: I have a large farm of mostly olive trees, fig trees, pomegranate trees, and guava trees.
The trees are planted in rows, and there is a 6 m (20 ft) between each tree. I currently plant vegetables in the area between the trees.

The crazy idea:
Step 1: make 1 m (3 ft) wide , 40 m (130 ft) long raised bed between each row of trees
Step 2: divide that long raised bed from the middle so each half is 20 m long.
Step 3: make raised bed cover similar to this one https://goo.gl/images/454FKQ
the frame would be 1 m wide, 20 m long, and 1 m tall. And it can be dragged to the other half of the raised bed. It will be equiped with roosting bars, and nesting buckets with a back door so eggs can be harvested from outside, and cover some areas with leather/wool to provide shade/warmth if needed.
Step 4: put 20-25 chickens in the covered half of the bed. Plant the other half with vegetables.
Step 5: throw dry leaves, food scraps, charcoal, wood ash, etc... to the chickens so they create compost.
Step 6: after 6 months, move the cover to the other half, where there will be the leftovers of the previous crop, and plant the other half that was tilled and fertilized by the chickens.
And the cycle continues, ideally I want to do this between each row of trees, but if you guys give me the approval, I will start with 1 raised bed per month.

What are your thoughts ?
 

Palestinian Farmer

In the Brooder
Oct 21, 2018
10
24
34
I use my empty beds during winter to make a covered hideout (from hawks) my chickens love it and they do wonders for next years plants. I would wonder about protection from rain or storms or the sun. Perhaps tarp a section of the hoops or build little moveable boxes. I think it’s a good idea.
Thank you MissChic for the response. And I live in a Mediterranean climate, so we don’t have harsh weather, but you’re right, I will add something that will protect them from the sun and the rain.
 

Alaskan

The Frosted Flake
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Hello everybody, I just had a crazy idea, and I wanted to run it through you guys:-

Introduction: I have a large farm of mostly olive trees, fig trees, pomegranate trees, and guava trees.
The trees are planted in rows, and there is a 6 m (20 ft) between each tree. I currently plant vegetables in the area between the trees.

The crazy idea:
Step 1: make 1 m (3 ft) wide , 40 m (130 ft) long raised bed between each row of trees
Step 2: divide that long raised bed from the middle so each half is 20 m long.
Step 3: make raised bed cover similar to this one https://goo.gl/images/454FKQ
the frame would be 1 m wide, 20 m long, and 1 m tall. And it can be dragged to the other half of the raised bed. It will be equiped with roosting bars, and nesting buckets with a back door so eggs can be harvested from outside, and cover some areas with leather/wool to provide shade/warmth if needed.
Step 4: put 20-25 chickens in the covered half of the bed. Plant the other half with vegetables.
Step 5: throw dry leaves, food scraps, charcoal, wood ash, etc... to the chickens so they create compost.
Step 6: after 6 months, move the cover to the other half, where there will be the leftovers of the previous crop, and plant the other half that was tilled and fertilized by the chickens.
And the cycle continues, ideally I want to do this between each row of trees, but if you guys give me the approval, I will start with 1 raised bed per month.

What are your thoughts ?
That will work well.

You might need to adjust the amount of birds kept inside.

But, really you are just making a chicken tractor kind of thing.

When you move the chickens off, till in the poo well, and give it one good soaking. If you no longer smell ammonia, it should be OK.

I let my birds stay in my greenhouse all winter, then they leave and I plant in the poo filled soil in the spring. I soak the ground thoroughly, AND transplant the seedlings. So, the seedlings have a bit of poo free soil around them, with which they are transplanted.

If the seedlings are transplanted with little to no clean soil they do suffer from nitrogen burn.

After a month of my transplants growing in the soil... and all of that watering, I can direct seed.

So.... you will need to experiment a bit to see what works for you.
 

Palestinian Farmer

In the Brooder
Oct 21, 2018
10
24
34
That will work well.

You might need to adjust the amount of birds kept inside.

But, really you are just making a chicken tractor kind of thing.

When you move the chickens off, till in the poo well, and give it one good soaking. If you no longer smell ammonia, it should be OK.

I let my birds stay in my greenhouse all winter, then they leave and I plant in the poo filled soil in the spring. I soak the ground thoroughly, AND transplant the seedlings. So, the seedlings have a bit of poo free soil around them, with which they are transplanted.

If the seedlings are transplanted with little to no clean soil they do suffer from nitrogen burn.

After a month of my transplants growing in the soil... and all of that watering, I can direct seed.

So.... you will need to experiment a bit to see what works for you.

That’s interesting, and honestly the point you mentioned about burning the plants was the only thing discouraging me from this system, and the reason I started this thread. But I currently have a deep litter system, and I’m very liberal with adding dry leaves and other high carbon sources, and since starting that system I forgot how ammonia smells like, all i smell is a dark rich soil which actually gave me the idea of the proposed system to be more efficient and cost effective.
 

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