Rhode Island Whites

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by Raindog7817, Oct 21, 2010.

  1. Chickielady

    Chickielady Spiritwood Farms

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    Mar 10, 2010
    Raymond, WA
    My Coop
    I have a wonderful announcement to make::: MOT (MeatOntheTable) my Cockeral RIW, has found he has an irresistible desire to jump on the pullets backs !
    :lol
    The pullets do not have a clue why and are not taking this well.
    None are laying yet.
    I have yet to hear any mature chicken speak whatsoever, they peep and make various seagull type noises.
    No crowing, no acting Cocky.
    No roosting at night !
    Seems to me a heritage breed quote " that grows slowly" will not be laying anytime soon.
    They will be 5 Months old on the 27th of January.
    I am expecting the pullets will begin to lay at 7 or 8 months old ?
    Anyone know ?
    We are working on getting the garden turned here.
    Seeds have been ordered and saved, and manure and shavings turned all year, this our second garden on raw land, should be wonderful !
    I am very excited about that !
    On another and more bizarre note, a friend of mine and I have noticed the uncanny resemblance these RIW look like Chanteclers...hmmmmmmmmmmmm, weird.
    But they resemble chanteclers much much more than rocks, leghorns or any other breed.
    So weird.
    Maybe they are chanteclers !!
    Although MOT is doning a wonderful rose comb...so sadly but for that they look/size/feather/all looks like chantecler.
    OK, other than that and getting diagnosed with RA on top of all the other disease I already have, nothing new at Spiritwood Farm.
     
  2. Country Living Farm

    Country Living Farm Songster

    Apr 18, 2009
    Florida
    Since we both have the same lines, mine did not start to lay until about 9 months old. They started to roost around 6-7 months old as well. I hope to candle my first eggs tonight.
     
  3. Chickielady

    Chickielady Spiritwood Farms

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    Well, he is sure mounting and trying...funny huh ?
    They just started to roost...still making purring/seagull-like noises not at all like most chickens...so we will look for eggs in another month or so ?
    Slow growing is not the word for these birds.
    I sure like them more everyday.
    Please post pictures of your chicks and birds.
     
  4. Quote:Ok so for education sake, both have single combs right? Are RIWs more slender than Rocks? Mine is pretty fluffy compared to my RIR (although I have a hatchery one so it may not be accurate).

    ETA Chris was responding while I was! I forgot heritage RIR can have rose combs so would make sense the white ones would too.

    No. RIW should have rose combs. NOT single combs.
     
  5. Chickielady

    Chickielady Spiritwood Farms

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    RIW are also extremely slow growing and they have a much different body shape called a "type", they are very tall, and long backed, with a brick shape body unlike rocks.
     
  6. kathyinmo

    kathyinmo Nothing In Moderation

    Quote:Ok so for education sake, both have single combs right? Are RIWs more slender than Rocks? Mine is pretty fluffy compared to my RIR (although I have a hatchery one so it may not be accurate).

    ETA Chris was responding while I was! I forgot heritage RIR can have rose combs so would make sense the white ones would too.

    No. RIW should have rose combs. NOT single combs.

    Yes, I agree as well. Rhode Island Whites have ONLY rose combs. NO single combs in these breed.
     
  7. kathyinmo

    kathyinmo Nothing In Moderation

    I thought this would be beneficial to see. Hope it helps....

    from this site: http://www.albc-usa.org/cpl/rhodewhite.html

    [​IMG]

    Rhode Island White Chicken
    The Rhode Island White originated in 1888 through the efforts of Mr. J. Alonzo Jocoy of Peacedale, Rhode Island. He developed the breed by crossing White Wyandottes with Partridge Cochins and Rose Comb White Leghorns. In 1903, Mr. Jocoy made the breed known to the public and offered individuals for sale. The breed continued to be developed and improved so that it more closely resembled the Rhode Island Red’s brick-like body shape. This distinctive shape helped to prevent the breed from looking similar to and being confused with White Wyandottes or White Plymouth Rock chickens. In 1922 the Rhode Island White was admitted to the American Poultry Association’s Standard of Perfection during the national conference in Knoxville, Tennessee, that year. The Rhode Island White gained some popularity in the US up until the 1960’s, at which time their numbers began to decline. The breed never came close to the overwhelming popularity that the more famous Rhode Island Red chicken achieved.

    The Rhode Island White is a moderately-sized, completely white bird with the males weighing 8 1/2 lbs. and females 6 1/2 lbs. They have long, broad, and deep bodies which are carried horizontally, giving them an oblong and brick-like appearance overall. Their breasts are deep, full, and well rounded. Their heads are fairly deep and are inclined to be flat on top rather than round. Though some single combed offspring do occasionally occur, the breed is has been standardized only with a rose shaped comb.

    The historic laying ability of the Rhode Island White was respectable by all accounts, with one exceptional hen at the Mountain Grove Experiment Station in Missouri noted as laying 306 eggs in one year. Productive strains of this breed have been known to more typically lay in the 240-250 eggs per year range. They are reputed to be splendid meat fowl and excellent layers of winter eggs. Rhode Island Whites are pleasant, easy going chickens and would make an enjoyable addition to any family farm. Today, the Rhode Island White chicken continues to have its followers and maintains a population of less than 3000 birds (2003 ALBC poultry census).

    Status: Watch

    Though some single combed offspring do occasionally occur, the breed is has been standardized only with a rose shaped comb. tells me that the occasional single combed birds would be culls.
     
  8. punky rooster

    punky rooster Awesome

    Jul 21, 2010
    Quote:No. RIW should have rose combs. NOT single combs.

    Yes, I agree as well. Rhode Island Whites have ONLY rose combs. NO single combs in these breed.

    Just because its not recognized does not mean they don't exist [​IMG]
    punky
     
  9. Chris09

    Chris09 Circle (M) Ranch

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    Quote:If they are true R.I. Whites they should be around 14 - 16 inches from the ground to the flat of the back which should be flat and parallel with the ground.

    They should look just like a Rose Comb Rhode Island Red but only White in color and not Red...

    Chris
     
  10. Quote:Yes, I agree as well. Rhode Island Whites have ONLY rose combs. NO single combs in these breed.

    Just because its not recognized does not mean they don't exist [​IMG]
    punky

    Sure they exist....but they shouldn't be used for breeding if they have a single comb. Just like Wyandottes with single combs do exist. Some people even keep one or two in their flock. But if you're breeding for type and perservation you're wasting your time reproducing cull birds, IMO. [​IMG]

    More than likely the OP has Leghorns...RIWs are extremely rare.
     

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