Rooster in poor condition

Michelle 74

In the Brooder
Dec 30, 2020
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I purchased a buff Orpington rooster from a buyer I trusted just after Christmas a couple of days ago. I didn't look him over unfortunately.
He seems to be in very poor condition. I think he has bumble foot. His skin on his belly is red raw, lots of feathers missing, his eyes appear a little dull and his comb has black along the top edge and is kind of strangely gritty. His bottom is dirty and he is doing foul smelling mustard coloured poos. I think he must of been kept in dirty conditions.
Feeling over whelmed with where to start to care for him.
The sellers offered to take him back, but I couldn't do that to the poor fellow, I'd rather put him down.
I've bathed him in Epsom salts and put coconut oil on his raw skin. Fed him some boiled mashed egg and put some apple cider vinegar in his water.
His feet have got to the point of thick black scabs. I've read how to deal with this but I'm not sure it's something I can manage, or if it would be kinder to put him down.
He's a very gentle fellow and has quickly given me his trust. I would like to help him if I can.
Needing some knowledgeable chicken support please.
 

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azygous

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Dec 11, 2009
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I think you are on the right track considering ending his suffering. Not even seeing the rest of him, by the looks of his fairly advanced bumblefoot and your descriptions of his other problems, I'd say he has extensive infection in that foot, and he's in danger of losing the foot and is already suffering infection in the foot bones.

His comb likely has frost bite. He likely has a heavy worm load and the yellow poop may be a symptom of liver disease.

People that don't care for their animals are less than the animals they abuse. They deserve nothing but contempt.
 

Michelle 74

In the Brooder
Dec 30, 2020
18
13
31
I think you are on the right track considering ending his suffering. Not even seeing the rest of him, by the looks of his fairly advanced bumblefoot and your descriptions of his other problems, I'd say he has extensive infection in that foot, and he's in danger of losing the foot and is already suffering infection in the foot bones.

His comb likely has frost bite. He likely has a heavy worm load and the yellow poop may be a symptom of liver disease.

People that don't care for their animals are less than the animals they abuse. They deserve nothing but contempt.
Thank you for your feedback.
Both his feet are in the same condition.
It is very sad, but I think you might be right about ending his suffering.
 

azygous

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11 Years
Dec 11, 2009
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Long ago, a friend lost his entire flock to a bobcat and had one surviving hen that he asked me to take so she wouldn't be lonely. My friend loved his chickens, but he knew nothing about caring for their health and well being beyond feeding and sheltering them.

This hen had the worst case of bumblefoot I'd ever treated. It was a fraction of the seriousness of your rooster's feet. I treated her for two years and never conquered the infection in spite of antibiotics and numerous surgeries.

I would say that this rooster would require at least two years of expensive antibiotics and a very intensive regimen of care. If you choose that route, I predict you will likely end up euthanizing him at some point anyway. Doing it now will spare him the suffering he'd need to undergo before being released from it.
 

Michelle 74

In the Brooder
Dec 30, 2020
18
13
31
Long ago, a friend lost his entire flock to a bobcat and had one surviving hen that he asked me to take so she wouldn't be lonely. My friend loved his chickens, but he knew nothing about caring for their health and well being beyond feeding and sheltering them.

This hen had the worst case of bumblefoot I'd ever treated. It was a fraction of the seriousness of your rooster's feet. I treated her for two years and never conquered the infection in spite of antibiotics and numerous surgeries.

I would say that this rooster would require at least two years of expensive antibiotics and a very intensive regimen of care. If you choose that route, I predict you will likely end up euthanizing him at some point anyway. Doing it now will spare him the suffering he'd need to undergo before being released from it.
Ok.... That certainly puts things in perspective.
At least he's had a few days of love, care treats and an open space to crow and stretch and feel a bit like a rooster. 😕
Thank you for your information.
 

EmmaRainboe

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Jul 30, 2020
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I think putting him down would probably be best. Just remember you saved him life in those horrible conditions. Many would give him back to the seller so they don't have to deal with the loss or heartache of having to put him down. When in reality putting him down is the kinder option than sending him back.
 

Michelle 74

In the Brooder
Dec 30, 2020
18
13
31
So sorry this happened. That is possibly the worst case of bumble I've ever seen in my 11+ years of animal care. I think even if you got it out at this point, 90% of his foot would be gone. That's insane. How could anyone let an animal live like that for so long? 😟
Thank you for your support and advice 😊
Yes, it's very sad that he was allowed to get to such a condition. 😕
 

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