Oct 3, 2020
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Bethel, NY
Is it at all possible to get a photo of the black chick's poop? I for one derive a lot of information from a visual aid.

The fact that this chick is energetic, eating well, growing, etc. points to something of a more benign nature.

However, even a benign issue can present its own problems. We should try to identify it.
I will provide you with a photo when I’m back, unless the neighbors see the poop. Unfortunately, they other chicks immediately eat up all the blood and bloody pine shavings. Is that normal? I don’t know if they are eating the actual poop or just the blood surround it, I’ve only seen them eat the pine shavings. I was able to catch the bloody poop because I was actually watching her. I doubt my neighbors will be as attentive...

Hopefully she still will be alive and well tomorrow night when I return. What about the water from yesterday midday? I read online to replace it everyday but it was still mostly full when I left?
 

yakitori

Songster
Jun 22, 2020
559
973
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New York
Just a note that if the chicks are eating the pine shavings, they do need a bit of grit to help digest it. I read that you removed the grit, I’m not sure whether that meant you weren’t adding anymore or that you took all of the scattered grit out of the brooder as well...
 
Oct 3, 2020
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Bethel, NY
Chicken update -

I was about to log on to share some very positive news, but right before I went to the computer I saw our sick chicken have a bloody poop! We were gone for two days and the neighbors said they saw no bloody poop or shavings.

Last night when I returned I watched all three very perky energetic chicks each take a perfectly normal blood free poop. I have noticed nothing but healthy poops in the brooder all day and even an hour or so ago saw our "sick" chick (I put in quotes because she no longer SEEMS sick) take a very large, very healthy poop. I thought I was in the clear. Well, just moments ago I saw her take another poop, this one with blood.

I have uploaded an image, its very detailed and unpleasant, but may be helpful in diagnosing what's going on.

They are all still off grit, still taking their Corid, still on probiotics and still very much eating and drinking. Our bigger girl, the "sick" one, eats the most! I have done some research online and it looks like it may be healthy intestinal lining in her poop?

Chart:
https://chat.allotment-garden.org/index.php?topic=17568.0

IMG_8176 copy.jpg
 
Oct 3, 2020
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Bethel, NY
Welcome back home! did you see my message above? I don’t think not having grit is causing the blood in the stool, but it’ a good precaution to have against crop issues, especially if they’re eating the pine shavings!
Thanks! I just read it. They really only eat the few pine shavings that have blood on them and I don't see them eating as many. They have really all plumped up and grown significantly in the last three days since I took the grit out. For some reason, they only wanted to eat the grit instead of their food and now they are all eager to eat their food. I can add a little bit of grit back in, but I am not seeing any crop issues right now and its nice to see them eating their food!

I really am leaning against cocci since none of them are acting sick at all and only one has blood in their stool (that doesn't look like the photos I have seen of cocci bloody stools online) - it is more similar to the shedding of digestive lining, which can be caused by too much rough food or grit. I kind of want to see if the blood continues to lessen, in which case I will feel more comfortable adding some grit back in. Though its likely this poor chick just has internal hereditary issues.
 

yakitori

Songster
Jun 22, 2020
559
973
171
New York
Thanks! I just read it. They really only eat the few pine shavings that have blood on them and I don't see them eating as many. They have really all plumped up and grown significantly in the last three days since I took the grit out. For some reason, they only wanted to eat the grit instead of their food and now they are all eager to eat their food. I can add a little bit of grit back in, but I am not seeing any crop issues right now and its nice to see them eating their food!

I really am leaning against cocci since none of them are acting sick at all and only one has blood in their stool (that doesn't look like the photos I have seen of cocci bloody stools online) - it is more similar to the shedding of digestive lining, which can be caused by too much rough food or grit. I kind of want to see if the blood continues to lessen, in which case I will feel more comfortable adding some grit back in. Though its likely this poor chick just has internal hereditary issues.
With my bigger girls who roost, I often see one clump of poop which is “bloodier” than others. more often than not, there will be a bit of blood in each clump of poop. I’ve pretty much just ignored it - they all seem healthy and active. I would keep an eye out for other signs of health problems, but it could just be that one girl sheds bloodier lining than the rest...
 

lysmandor

Songster
Mar 26, 2020
146
228
111
Lansing, NY
Thanks! I just read it. They really only eat the few pine shavings that have blood on them and I don't see them eating as many. They have really all plumped up and grown significantly in the last three days since I took the grit out. For some reason, they only wanted to eat the grit instead of their food and now they are all eager to eat their food. I can add a little bit of grit back in, but I am not seeing any crop issues right now and its nice to see them eating their food!

I really am leaning against cocci since none of them are acting sick at all and only one has blood in their stool (that doesn't look like the photos I have seen of cocci bloody stools online) - it is more similar to the shedding of digestive lining, which can be caused by too much rough food or grit. I kind of want to see if the blood continues to lessen, in which case I will feel more comfortable adding some grit back in. Though its likely this poor chick just has internal hereditary issues.

With them preferring the grit - it's entirely possible that since that was all they had to eat for a while, they've learned that grit = food. Silly chicks!
 
Oct 3, 2020
67
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Bethel, NY
Hello All! I bought 4 new silkies to add to my flock from a local breeder. They are all around 4 -5 months old and she wasn't positive of their sex. None of them are crowing or laying yet and one is an EXTREME runt.

I thought I would post this thread I started here because there is much more engagement and you guys have been great! I would love to hear your educated guesses!

https://www.backyardchickens.com/threads/4-5-month-bearded-silkies-roos-or-hens.1423740/
 

ILoveDaffy

Songster
Aug 16, 2020
539
1,655
143
Be careful with the extreme runt. My pullet Daffy was an extreme runt and passed two weeks after I got her, even though I did everything exactly as suggested by BYC.
 
Oct 3, 2020
67
119
76
Bethel, NY
Be careful with the extreme runt. My pullet Daffy was an extreme runt and passed two weeks after I got her, even though I did everything exactly as suggested by BYC.
Hm.. yes, I am definitely worried about that. Did you see the photos of him/her? He acts very healthy and eats and drinks more than any of my other chickens. They are all 4 1/2 months and he is 1/3 the size... how did yours die? Natural causes or was he attacked by the flock or a predator?
 

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