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Jun 11, 2022
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Hi, I have a 2 year old silkie who was swooped by a magpie today and has caused an injury to her eye. Immediately after the attack she went into what I think is shock but it has now been over 6 hours and she is still laying in a basket of towels unresponsive. If I touch her she has what seems to be a fit where she will flap and roll around, but then go lifeless again. She also is breathing quite rapidly. Is there any hope for her? Can chickens go into shock for this long and still recover or should I be putting her out of her misery? :(
 

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I would keep her in a quiet and dim area. Keep her warm and check her often. Is there any bleeding from her eye? In the next few hours if she she moves or seems awake, try giving her very small sips of either sugar water or electrolytes drops at a time from a dropper or syringe, or even a straw or pipette. She may have some brain trauma, and that may take some time to go away.
 
I would keep her in a quiet and dim area. Keep her warm and check her often. Is there any bleeding from her eye? In the next few hours if she she moves or seems awake, try giving her very small sips of either sugar water or electrolytes drops at a time from a dropper or syringe, or even a straw or pipette. She may have some brain trauma, and that may take some time to go away.
There is a small amount of blood around her eye but I have soaked most of it up with gauze, it is just very swollen and a little oozy now, I’m also not sure if her neck is damaged, it feels straight but I have no idea what a broken neck could feel like
 
The magpie likely did more damage to this little lady than might be apparent. The convulsions when touched indicate neuro damage. A broken neck would render a chicken dead, but damaged nerves in the neck is nearly as bad.

Shock does last into a second day after an attack, and some shock shows up after the attack, delayed for hours. I keep hammering away here on this forum - Any accident requires treatment for shock before anything else. Warm Gatoraud or a teaspoon of sugar in a cup of warm water with a pinch of salt and baking soda. Get it into your patient any way you can.
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If she survives shock, then treat her injuries with vitamin E and B-complex to try to repair the damaged nerves.

To be honest, I would euthanize. This is your choice. If you sense that she has enough fight in her to recover, then by all means give her all the support you can.
 
The magpie likely did more damage to this little lady than might be apparent. The convulsions when touched indicate neuro damage. A broken neck would render a chicken dead, but damaged nerves in the neck is nearly as bad.

Shock does last into a second day after an attack, and some shock shows up after the attack, delayed for hours. I keep hammering away here on this forum - Any accident requires treatment for shock before anything else. Warm Gatoraud or a teaspoon of sugar in a cup of warm water with a pinch of salt and baking soda. Get it into your patient any way you can. View attachment 3144223If she survives shock, then treat her injuries with vitamin E and B-complex to try to repair the damaged nerves.

To be honest, I would euthanize. This is your choice. If you sense that she has enough fight in her to recover, then by all means give her all the support you can.
Thank you, I think I’ve needed someone to just tell me straight if I need to euthanize so that’s very helpful. If I was to let her fight a little longer how would you suggest healing the nerve damage?
 

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