anybody raise sprouts to feed the chickens?

Discussion in 'Feeding & Watering Your Flock' started by Delmar, Nov 30, 2010.

  1. MakNugget

    MakNugget Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 31, 2010
    Portland, OR
    Sure do. They insist I never give them enough.

    I would take care not to over do sprouts with high water content like alfa alfa, unless you enjoy runny poo. Usually when I have a batch of them going, I'll just grab a small handful to compliment whatever else they are getting.

    I don't care for sprouting boss manually. For some reason they are not as popular with the girls, but they do prefer it when it's growing in the sand run (other grains too) during the summer. Can't really do that during the winter since it takes too long in the cold and I end up getting squirrel and wild bird deposits instead of sprouts. If you want to do boss on a small scale instead of using 5 gal buckets, you can use a ziplock bag with boss and warm water. Force out all the air before sealing so that the seeds are submerged. Lay flat overnight, and follow normal sprouting procedure.

    I sprout oats, wheat, triticale regularly, and always have a batch of wheat in the sprouter for wheat grass which I cut up into manageable pieces.
     
  2. Delmar

    Delmar Chillin' With My Peeps

    Quote:What a great score!
     
  3. Delmar

    Delmar Chillin' With My Peeps

    I started soaking a bunch of pinto beans in a peanut butter jar last night. Did the firest rinse this morning. I'll let you know how they turn out.
     
  4. bantyshanty

    bantyshanty Oval Office Courier

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    S.W Pennsylvania
    This is a really useful post! I've done this with their scratch feed, but I didn't think of using oil sunflower. I give my flock the BOSS without shells.
    If I sprout them, I think the shells need to be still on, or not true?
    Can chickens eat the BOSS in the shell and break down the shell with grit?
     
  5. Organics North

    Organics North Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Dec 30, 2009
    Wisconsin Northwoods
    Quote:I have never done it but I think I have read it is safe..

    (For those wondering....raw Beans have a anti-nutrient quality.) I am pretty sure that sprouting them removes the anti nutrient and makes them safe.)


    This is a really useful post! I've done this with their scratch feed, but I didn't think of using oil sunflower. I give my flock the BOSS without shells.
    If I sprout them, I think the shells need to be still on, or not true?
    Can chickens eat the BOSS in the shell and break down the shell with grit?

    Yes to sprout the shell needs to be on. Birds do fine with the shells.

    Quote:I have nice dry firm poo, not too smelly either... However I do limit the sprouts I feed about 1.5 cups per 6 birds morning and night. The sprouts are mixed with dry ingredients to make a just barely moist "mash".

    ON​
     
    Last edited: Dec 2, 2010
    1 person likes this.
  6. BlackBart

    BlackBart Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 29, 2009
    Quote:here is a bit of data on sprouted flaxseed, the nutritional levels increase quite a bit, that is why some horse owners are letting the flaxseed sprout in their horses mash prior to feeding.

    http://www.health4allproducts.com/compare.htm
     
  7. Delmar

    Delmar Chillin' With My Peeps

    FYI I started with pinto beans because we had some in the cupboard, but my intention to to mostly work with grains like corn, wheat and soy beans, that I can buy by the bushel from local farmers rather than seeds that have to be shipped in, that I have to pay by the pound for. There are a lot of "sprouting seeds" on the internet for
    4-5 dollars/ pound! No thanks!
     
  8. Lotsapaints

    Lotsapaints Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 17, 2010
    Paso Robles, CA
    I buy "re-cleaned" oats and wheat 11.00 for 50lbs at the feed mill see if you can find one close
     
  9. Delmar

    Delmar Chillin' With My Peeps

    I do live in a farming community, so it won't be a problem.
     
  10. kenh2010

    kenh2010 Out Of The Brooder

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    We do quite a bit of sprouting for our family and if you're using the cheescloth/rubber band on a mason jar method I've found it easier to cut a circle of plastic needlepoint canvas that fits the top of the jar and then use a canning jar ring to hold it onto the jar for the straining process. Lasts forever and is easily washable. I'm new to the forum and am learning a lot - hope to get our first chicks this spring! Thanks and hope this helps someone!
     
    2 people like this.

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