Bad rooster

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by bantygirl, Oct 27, 2013.

  1. bantygirl

    bantygirl Out Of The Brooder

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    I have a polish Roo who is very aggressive, he attacked me so I was gonna give him away, but hubby said to give him a second chance, so we let him free range in our coop area he seems calmer, but he attacked me again today, is there any thing I can do to chill him out we try to hand feed him and be around and not threatening but man he is nasty, I hate that he is bad cause he is beautiful and I have a hen want eggs to hatch, any help is welcome good or bad
     
  2. ChickensAreSweet

    ChickensAreSweet Heavenly Grains for Hens

    Get rid of him is my advice.
     
  3. newbie32

    newbie32 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    My opinion is to get rid of him. 2 Floggings is enough! Roosters are cheap, if not free! I have a polish cockerel that is absolutely lovely to look at. But if he flogs me he is dinner!

    I am learning from people with decades of experience that a bad roo is not worth it when there are sooo many good ones that are easy to obtain.
     
  4. bantygirl

    bantygirl Out Of The Brooder

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    Thanks that's what I'm leaning toward but hubby wants to give him another chance I ave had 3 calls from people that will take him mean and all but hubby likes him, if he attacks me again he's toast thanks
     
  5. newbie32

    newbie32 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    [​IMG] Tell your hubby that YOU should come first.
     
    1 person likes this.
  6. WalkingOnSunshine

    WalkingOnSunshine Overrun With Chickens

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    I agree, humans come first. And you aren't going to reform this rooster.

    Tell your husband that you do NOT want chicks from this rooster. Aggressive behavior has a strong genetic component, so you will be breeding this behavior into your flock. If you hatch chicks from this boy, you'll have to watch your back around your rooster forever.

    Roosters are extremely easy to come by. I give away roosters routinely, and am thrilled to do so, as the alternative is often to cull them. When raising roosters, many of us subscribe to a very strict policy--show any aggression at all, and you are GONE. That's because we don't want to perpetuate those aggressive genes in our flocks, as well as the fact that we want to enjoy our birds, not watch our backs. And there is nothing that shows that human-aggressive roosters are any better at protecting their flocks than non-human-aggressive roosters.

    You're ahead of most people who come to BYC with a problem rooster because you already have people who want him (although I'd be a little nervous about such enthusiasm--is there a lot of cockfighting near you?). As for a new boy, look on Craigslist, look on the Buy-Sell-Trade forum here at BYC, and you'll find a new boy. You can find even purebred roosters free and cheap almost any time of year. Heck, I gave away a cockerel to a guy I met in TSC this past spring who wanted a rooster. Then be prepared to get rid of any boy that shows aggression towards you or the hens and try again.

    Every single day, so many good, non-aggressive roosters are killed simply because people can't keep them. Instead of giving a home to a proven aggressor, save one of the non-violent boys whose only crime is being born male.

    (end of sermon [​IMG])
     
    Last edited: Oct 28, 2013
    4 people like this.
  7. bantygirl

    bantygirl Out Of The Brooder

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    Thanks that is good advice, we do love our chickens me more so the hubby but Fred ( bad roo) is such a handsome boy and he is a challenge I think that's y he wants to keep him, but u r right I come first and I don't enjoy spending time in my coop area alone anymore so ill tell him By By Birdie lol
     
  8. enola

    enola Overrun With Chickens

    I give them three chances. The first time I am attacked I chase him down and clobber him a few times. The second time I catch him and knock the crap out of him. Then I stick him in water and slosh him around until he is soaked.

    The third time it is lights out!!

    I force my roosters to stay/move away from me EVERY time I am in the coop.

    Most roosters never need any more "treatment" after the water session. :)
     
    1 person likes this.
  9. davemix1

    davemix1 New Egg

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    We have a rooster which we wanted to try and keep but he has turned bad also. He is a large Rhode Island red, he had the run of the flock of six birds but got too aggressive and ended up chewing a large hole in the back neck of one of our black Auster Lopps. This injury started off small and we figured it was from the rooster grabbing the neck of our chicken while mating. Although my boy at first accused the dog which I quickly countered. Over the next three days we noticed this hole or injury became the size of a quarter of missing skin and feathers. My boy was very sad for his favorite first chicken. My other boy said we need to take it to the vet dad. I said you don't take chickens to the vet. at least I was not going to spend money at the vet. we got out the first aide kit with bandages we had left over from grandma's injuries years ago. we put Neosporin on the wound we put a big gauze pad and tape completely around the neck. we left this on for a week and amazingly impressed at how this skin has completely grown back in that time the new Band-Aid has been on for four days now and we will leave it on for another few days before we take it off and check the injury my boy and I are very thrilled that this bird has survived this attack by the rooster. this is one of his first two black Auster lops and this one lays the largest eggs ,five so far had double yolks
     
  10. WalkingOnSunshine

    WalkingOnSunshine Overrun With Chickens

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    I hope you get rid of this rooster pronto. Human aggression is bad enough, but I truly believe that roosters that harm hens are mentally unbalanced. A rooster's job is to protect the hens, find them treats, keep the hen squabbles from getting out of control, and fertilize the eggs. Harming hens is contrary to all of the things that a rooster is in your flock to do. Were he in my flock, I would have culled him (not given him away) the day he harmed the hen.
     

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