Dixie Chicks

Discussion in 'Random Ramblings' started by Amberjem, Jan 1, 2015.

  1. minihorse927

    minihorse927 Whipper snapper Premium Member

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    The chocolate, even with chicks, won't hardly move. She starts moving only when the chicks run out from under her and start to investigate things.
     
  2. perchie.girl

    perchie.girl Desert Dweller Premium Member

     
  3. minihorse927

    minihorse927 Whipper snapper Premium Member

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    the first week and a half or so with her everything went fine. Then one day she did poop in the nest and I thought, eh just a accident. Then it was daily. That's when I started throwing her off the nest. It got worse once the chick starts to peep and scratch in the eggs. I had to clean the nest everyday and force her to eat and drink. Bleh
     
  4. Bogtown Chick

    Bogtown Chick Overrun With Chickens

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    Felix...I'm so sorry about Virpi. [​IMG]

    That's a tough one. The humbleness that comes with chickening is endless. Sometimes things are out of your control though. and That is at least something to hang a hat on.

    Why she chose not to eat/drink as much is a little choice in her head you'll never know. I will let you know that I had my Silkie broody for two weeks before I got eggs under her--messing around trying to get ebay eggs and eggs from a breeder-- then tack on the 21 days. I think now that I'm quite lucky that she knew enough to get up and eat, drink, poo a couple times a day. These birds have a variety in their instincts and not all of them make sense.

    I know it may not make you feel any better, but I hope it helps ease a bit with time too.
     
  5. vehve

    vehve The Token Finn

    She did eat every day, but by the time she got the eggs, she had been broody a good 3-4 weeks. And before that, she had only been laying for three weeks since her previous broodyness. She just exhausted herself. She did a good job though.

    Now I'm hoping for another broody. We're going to have to hatch out some more chicks to get a decent egg production going in summer again. I'd prefer the natural route, I'm not too enthusiastic about incubating.

    Thanks for the condolences everyone.
     
    Last edited: Feb 17, 2015
  6. Outpost JWB

    Outpost JWB Chillin' With My Peeps

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    That is what we do with our broody hen. If she has not got back on the nest within 15minutes, we put her back. Little girl put a small food dish in the corner of the nest box last year which turned out good. She was such a broodzilla that no other chicken would come near it.

    @vehve , So sorry. So often chickens are so strong that we never realize anything is wrong until it's too late.
     
  7. vehve

    vehve The Token Finn

    Yeah, most animals try to hide that they're sick, you can't show weakness in the wild. I was mistaking her passivity as her being overly concerned with the chicks, so it went unnoticed for some time. Next time I'll be sure to keep a closer eye on them, and maybe feel for weight loss.

    In sprouting news, it's crazy what 12 hours will do.

    Morning:
    [​IMG]
    Evening:
    [​IMG]
     
  8. Amberjem

    Amberjem Overrun With Chickens

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    first set of wheels loosely put on...ment to get the baby chicks in there but these guys decided they wanted to explore so I went with it...wheeled over to a nice spot to enjoy
     
  9. Bogtown Chick

    Bogtown Chick Overrun With Chickens

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    Vehve another thing that's came to mind --and not to expound or beat you up about it because believe me whe I say we're all learning no matter how long we've had chickens!--One other thing to maybe suggest on brooding is the time of year in a northern climate. So much energy is used for keeping warm that if the bird is burning more calories for warmth and not eating AS much food that's a double stressor there. Naturally ducks/geese in the wild are brooding in the spring.
     
  10. hennible

    hennible Overrun With Chickens

    That's a good point bog, maybe that's why my bantam didn't do too badly, she was indoors when she had her long brood... Because it was late in the year and it was cold.
     

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