Naked Neck/Turken Thread

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by josh44, Feb 25, 2010.

  1. Lacey1988

    Lacey1988 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Almost old enough to take over my main roos spot...I'm going to breed him to all of my girls including a black polish

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    Him and my white hen( Silver laced Wyandotte/Red Star) are going to make me some gorgeous babies come spring

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  2. NewToFarming

    NewToFarming Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hi Flower! My NN's outlay my leghorns! What does the fermented feed do?
     
  3. pgpoultry

    pgpoultry Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Only a couple of my 'mongrels' are laying at the moment. Pretty well everybody over a year old has had an impressive moult (apart from my massive Dark Brahma hen who neither moults nor lays), but they are all feathered out again. My NNs are not laying. To be honest, I'm amazed that anybody would lay during the rain-lashed weeks we have recently had, but it's been a bit brighter though much colder here over the last few days.

    Our day lengths are quite short 'in the dark days before Xmas'.....not light until gone 8:00 a.m and dark again by 4:00 p.m. What day lengths are you getting in the USA? (I'm sure there's a lot of variability!).Some of my hens who stop have stopped laying often start up very promptly once the days start to lengthen....on or about Xmas day usually. I don't provide artificial light personally as I like my birds to have as natural a life as possible.

    Flower...fermented feed sounds as though it would make them drunk! I have to bury my discarded sloes (from making sloe gin) in the compost to stop wild birds eating them. However.....I'm sure that the rats which are inevitably in there have a wild couple of nights.

    Does anyone heat their coops in the depths of winter? I don't, but I make sure that the birds have lots of food in the short days.....adding hot porridge with ground up egg shells, dried milk and sunflower seeds. If I don't feed them lots they just steal the sheep pellets (which incidentally have a composition almost identical to layers pellets). I place straw on the floor in the coops and throw an old groundsheet over my smaller coop.
     
  4. flower

    flower Chillin' With My Peeps

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    first of all fermented feet swells up to be three times the size of the original, for that reason the birds drink less plain water. Also it is touted to nicely increase the amount of protien, introduce probiotics and other nutrients. according to what I have read there should be nice firm poops, no diarrhea or otherwise loose poops and so it should be more healthy and help irds gain weight. Looking at it from all angles it might even cost less. there is a thread dedicated to ff
     
  5. flower

    flower Chillin' With My Peeps

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    "Flower...fermented feed sounds as though it would make them drunk! I have to bury my discarded sloes (from making sloe gin) in the compost to stop wild birds eating them. However.....I'm sure that the rats which are inevitably in there have a wild couple of nights."

    Sandie..... I am shouting, "Are your for reeeaal " ? Actually some people go to breweries and harvest their spend grains for animal feed and fertilizer. ETOH is formed from the vapor turned to liquid ???? and your rats are not drunk, just well fed. And do you really use Juniper Berries to make sloe gin ?

    Our days In the south west start as early as 06:47 or about since I am a late sleeper as I go to bed late. The days end at 16:47 You and your mongrels are located much more north of us, so you day are shorter. Say hello to Gorden for me.
     
  6. pgpoultry

    pgpoultry Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Flower your typos are even better than mine.....'fermented FEET swell up three times the size of the original'.

    Sloes are tiny and almost black wild plums with a very intense flavour and lots of tannin which grow well round here. They can't be eaten BUT when packed into a preserving jar, doused with sugar, and the jar filled with neat gin they make a delightful deep purple liquor. Damsons ( a bigger wild plum that grow better at lower altitude) are also used but they don't have such a strong flavour. The residue which I throw away is essentially gin-soaked fruit.......

    I have been known to ferment just about everything (down to pea pods, parsnips, and carrots) to turn into wine, and the wild birds will certainly eat these. I also like to make sourdough starter and 'wild yeast' ginger beer, so lots of fermenting during our pitiful summer.

    Gordon is crowing for you as we speak.
     
  7. Kassaundra

    Kassaundra Sonic screwdrivers are cool!

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    Fermenting the grains doesn't turn it to ETOH. It also doesn't actually increase the amount of protien or nutrients in the grains, but the grains have anti-nutrients that inhibit digestion and accessebility of protien as well as other nutrients, the fermenting process makes those accessible to digest for the animals. Similar to the multi stomach animals, also sprouting reduces the anti-nutrients of the grain seeds too.
     
  8. flower

    flower Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Kassaundra now I know why you named one of your birds Mensa. And than you for the information helping us understand why fermenting food makes their nutrition more available. I wonder if I ferment sprouted grains a double benefit would result.


    'fermented FEET swell up three times the size of the original'. PG At least I know that my posts are being read. I love it ! a good laugh caused by my very own pen even if it was not clever but a mistake. Wow you must have a happy summer to stave off the darkenss of winter. Koreans ferment their food also but the results are for their diet not the birds.
     
  9. Georgia Boy 1970

    Georgia Boy 1970 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Pics taken today.
     
  10. Georgia Boy 1970

    Georgia Boy 1970 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Some of the naked neck chicks from New To Farming.The chicks in the last three pics look like they may feather out solid white[​IMG].
     

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