OVER THE COUNTER MEDICATIONS (OTC) IMPACTED BY NEW FDA PRESCRIPTION REQUIREMENTS INITIATIVE

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by EdenCamp, Oct 24, 2015.

  1. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member Project Manager

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    If this is true then one could still buy most drugs since all but Tylan Powder can be used in other lovestock. This would explain why Tylan Powder is no longer available without a prescription.

    -Kathy
     
    Last edited: Oct 26, 2015
  2. JanetMarie

    JanetMarie Chillin' With My Peeps

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    My brother had the polio vaccination, and he got the polio disease. That was in the late 60s-early 70s.
     
    Last edited: Oct 26, 2015
  3. rnchick74

    rnchick74 Urban Chick Keeper

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    I'm going to throw my 2 cents worth here...

    DISCLAIMER: RN, advanced training in microbiology & infection control

    I'm cautiously optimistic that these changes in the FDA will lead to less discriminant antibiotic use. I do like the convenience of being able to buy almost any antibiotic & wormer I could want/need at my local farm store, I use them only as needed when there is a true medical need. I do my own fecal float tests & only worm when/if there are worms/eggs present & only treat for those seen. Antibiotics - they have a place & time for use. Just like in humans - bacterial infections sometimes need to be treated with antibiotics. Unfortunately with food animals (if you raise meat/dual source birds) you then have a choice to make: are you willing to eat a bird that has been treated with a short term episode of antibiotics or do you now have a new life-long pet. Also, you need to know which antibiotic to use for what. Great rule of thumb - don't hit with the heavy hitter when a lower level antibiotic will work for the pathogen. Use for a full course & don't miss doses, but don't do back to back runs or a shotgun approach. Have a general clue what you are treating.

    In my personal flock, I do use antibiotics as needed, very discriminately. We do have an avian vet here but he is quite $$$$. I've consulted with him once to the tune of $300. It will be a rare case that I do that again. I'm lucky that I have the education & tools to diagnose a lot of things myself. I've used antibiotics only twice, for very limited episodes. I've wormed only once for confirmed worms in fecal floats.

    I do think that the overall health practices of your flock have a major impact - as others have stated. I use high quality feed, fermented to provide good gut nutrition. I maintain good cleanliness in the coop/run; lots of fresh air; clean water (love my chicken fountain!) sunlight; darkness at night (also as important as sunlight); mental stimulation; and human interaction.

    I'm a firm believer in vaccines in humans and pets. Spacing is important & I'm glad the pet vaccines are now multi-year. After seeing deaths from the Flu, we make sure to get our flu shot yearly. Herd immunity is important as not all of the population CAN get immunized. As far as my flock, we have a high mosquito area - so I do the pox vaccine as well a marreck vaccine.

    Thanks for intelligent and civil adult conversation on this important topic. I will be picking up some antibiotics and other supplies before they are gone!
     
    Last edited: Oct 26, 2015
    1 person likes this.
  4. EdenCamp

    EdenCamp Chillin' With My Peeps

  5. EdenCamp

    EdenCamp Chillin' With My Peeps

    YUP, the first vac at 6 mo was good for a year. Second va was good for 3 years. Now, for some reason changed to every year - yeah right!
     
  6. Blooie

    Blooie Team Spina Bifida Premium Member

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    I just did the searches and we have exactly 2 Avian Vets in this state....one in Beulah and one in Jackson. To get to Beulah we have to cross the Big Horn Mountains and drive to the South Dakota state line. To get to the one in Jackson we have to drive through Yellowstone Park and through Grand Teton National Park. Now that's during the summer when the roads are open. If we try Beulah in the winter and the passes are closed it means driving 2 hours up to Billings, Montana, then down through Sheridan. Um, not happening! To get to Jackson when the east gate of the Park is closed it's even worse. Buelah, almost 6 hours one way if the passes are open. Jackson's almost 6 hours when the Parks are open but you have to allow for slow speed limits (45) tourist traffic and animal jams. By the time I got my bird to the vet she'd probably be dead. <sigh>
     
  7. EdenCamp

    EdenCamp Chillin' With My Peeps

    Nope. This is not targeting poultry. The initiative is for vet med - food and water additives - for antibiotics also used for humans. The medications will require RX to purchase and no longer be available over the counter in feed stores or retailed online and the like. Injectables are not included - yet.
     
    1 person likes this.
  8. EdenCamp

    EdenCamp Chillin' With My Peeps

    Now you're getting it! This is part of the reason to also try to educate vets and show the need for including poultry in their practices. I would approach farm vets, large animal vets - and talk to them. They've at least likely seen a chicken around when vetting a cow or horse and understand the concept of livestock. Try to find one that will work with you before you are in crisis.
     
  9. Blooie

    Blooie Team Spina Bifida Premium Member

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    Oh, I got it right off.....nothing I haven't wondered about before and having worked for years in vets' offices even before I had chickens I wondered about it way back then. Three different veterinarians and not one of them ever wanted to work on birds. <Sigh>
     
  10. EdenCamp

    EdenCamp Chillin' With My Peeps

    Urban vets have the fluffy pet - dog and cat focus. Try finding livestock, large animal vets that work with farm animals. Think they'd be more inclined to be flexible.
     

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