Aussie-Chookmum

Crossing the Road
Apr 20, 2019
2,753
22,719
752
Blue Mountains, NSW, Australia
Unfortunately normal poop is not easy to classify. What might alarm say micstrachen might not worry me. Bear in mind what they eat is a major factor in what their poop looks like as is the weather.
I did think of making a poop chart but what I consider normal has in the past caused a lot of drama and huffiness when others have come along and told the OP that their hen is sick and told them to administer this drug, or that.
The best thing to do is look at their poop every day and as much of it as possible.
I know, not the greatest of pastimes. It will give you an idea of the range you can expect from your hens in your environment. For example, I get lots of black poop here, but the hens are still alive the next year. I get lots of watery poop with bits in. Post pictures of that on the forums and the next thing you know you'll have enough drug advice to run a clinic for junkies. The hens are still alive a year later.
Danger signs here are bright colours; bright green and bright yellow in particular, and of course blood.
Blood in poop of curse alarms everyone but it isn't that uncommon. Hens shed bits of intestine and do occasionally rupture small blood vessels in the oviduct.
I might do a poop small poop chart just for us here if anyone thinks it might help.
I see lots of it and it only needs photographing.

There are many other things that can lead one to believe a chicken is sick. Not all that visible type of behaviour necessarily means sickness of the body. Donk for example who I've been worried about recently has not looked herself recently. She is moulting, but it's very minor and she's not prone to hysterical behaviour. What is wrong with Donk is a) she wants to sit and hatch and b) she's having problems with Myth. The physiological stuff often gets overlooked and in extreme cases may cause other physical problems; not getting enough to eat, being constantly harassed when trying to lay eggs etc etc.
It is unfortunate that with chickens, by the time they look ill, it is often too late to do much about it.
It's very difficult for those who have busy working or social lives to monitor their chickens. Many people it seems only really notice their chickens at food time and when giving treats. The prospect of food can perk up a mildly sick chicken to the point of not be distinguishable in health from the others.
Those are good observations Shad.

I for one would be interested in a poop chart from you.
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.
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Of the chickens' poop of course! 😉
 

micstrachan

Crossing the Road
Premium Feather Member
Apr 10, 2016
7,727
24,336
867
Santa Cruz Mountains, California
Unfortunately normal poop is not easy to classify. What might alarm say micstrachen might not worry me. Bear in mind what they eat is a major factor in what their poop looks like as is the weather.
I did think of making a poop chart but what I consider normal has in the past caused a lot of drama and huffiness when others have come along and told the OP that their hen is sick and told them to administer this drug, or that.
The best thing to do is look at their poop every day and as much of it as possible.
I know, not the greatest of pastimes. It will give you an idea of the range you can expect from your hens in your environment. For example, I get lots of black poop here, but the hens are still alive the next year. I get lots of watery poop with bits in. Post pictures of that on the forums and the next thing you know you'll have enough drug advice to run a clinic for junkies. The hens are still alive a year later.
Danger signs here are bright colours; bright green and bright yellow in particular, and of course blood.
Blood in poop of curse alarms everyone but it isn't that uncommon. Hens shed bits of intestine and do occasionally rupture small blood vessels in the oviduct.
I might do a poop small poop chart just for us here if anyone thinks it might help.
I see lots of it and it only needs photographing.

There are many other things that can lead one to believe a chicken is sick. Not all that visible type of behaviour necessarily means sickness of the body. Donk for example who I've been worried about recently has not looked herself recently. She is moulting, but it's very minor and she's not prone to hysterical behaviour. What is wrong with Donk is a) she wants to sit and hatch and b) she's having problems with Myth. The physiological stuff often gets overlooked and in extreme cases may cause other physical problems; not getting enough to eat, being constantly harassed when trying to lay eggs etc etc.
It is unfortunate that with chickens, by the time they look ill, it is often too late to do much about it.
It's very difficult for those who have busy working or social lives to monitor their chickens. Many people it seems only really notice their chickens at food time and when giving treats. The prospect of food can perk up a mildly sick chicken to the point of not be distinguishable in health from the others.
I only get “alarmed” by poop if there is behavior to go with it. The first several times Roxy had black poop, it was from eating wood ash and I didn’t think a thing of it. She seemed to be self medicating for whatever was causing her urates to be yellow. When she had black poop, her comb went pale, she got lethargic and she was open mouth breathing, I brought her to the avian vet who confirmed anemia. When Lucky had a slimy back end combined with standing around, I was concerned and brought her in. It turned out she had a broken egg inside. When Ruby pooped liquid and bits of bright kelly green, she was dropping weight and getting lethargic. An avian vet prescribed antibiotics and antii-inflammatories for the abdominal swelling. I took it upon myself to syringe meal supplements for a couple days. She’d perk up just a few minutes after the meal and eventually got her own appetite back. But bits of regular colored poop on a hot day is to be expected here, as they drink more and eat less than an average day. If they are confined to the run where I know exactly what they are eating and have a change in poop, I certainly notice and am extra observant of their behavior. Alarmed? No. Only if there is a second symptom. There have been countless times that the poop wasn’t right and the bird had other symptoms, but I gave it a couple days and it cleared on its own.
 

Shadrach

Roosterist
Jul 31, 2018
15,233
109,736
1,532
Catalonia, Spain
My Coop
I only get “alarmed” by poop if there is behavior to go with it. The first several times Roxy had black poop, it was from eating wood ash and I didn’t think a thing of it. She seemed to be self medicating for whatever was causing her urates to be yellow. When she had black poop, her comb went pale, she got lethargic and she was open mouth breathing, I brought her to the avian vet who confirmed anemia. When Lucky had a slimy back end combined with standing around, I was concerned and brought her in. It turned out she had a broken egg inside. When Ruby pooped liquid and bits of bright kelly green, she was dropping weight and getting lethargic. An avian vet prescribed antibiotics and antii-inflammatories for the abdominal swelling. I took it upon myself to syringe meal supplements for a couple days. She’d perk up just a few minutes after the meal and eventually got her own appetite back. But bits of regular colored poop on a hot day is to be expected here, as they drink more and eat less than an average day. If they are confined to the run where I know exactly what they are eating and have a change in poop, I certainly notice and am extra observant of their behavior. Alarmed? No. Only if there is a second symptom. There have been countless times that the poop wasn’t right and the bird had other symptoms, but I gave it a couple days and it cleared on its own.
Words, they sometimes make communication difficult.:)
By alarmed I meant warned of a problem, raising some concern. I didn't mean sent into a panic, or intend any other derogatory connotation.
 

Mmanist

Crowing
Jul 20, 2018
873
3,560
266
Ohio
My Coop
It's Time to Fire Up the Way-Back Machine

Let's head back 2 years, Mr. Peabody set the way-back machine for September 12-17, 2018.

September 12, 2018 was a bad day. I was feeling especially low that evening. I was out sitting at the end of the coop. I had the coop door open as I was watching them roost. I was very late getting out. Lilly got down off the roost and came to the door to check on what i was doing.
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The next thing that happened is one of those things that just endear these animals to me. She hopped down and then jumped up into my lap. She had never done that before and has never done it since.
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I instantly felt better. :love

During this time frame Patsy and Lilly were a flock of their own with Daisy, the greatest hen ever having passed earlier in the year.

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This was coming to an end as we were starting full integration of Jabberwocky, I was still deluding myself thinking he was a pullet, and Hattie.

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Final time roosting in the prefab coop.

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Where did our coop go?
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How do we get in this big one? There is no door here!

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Finally figured it out
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Let's go back to the beginning now, Mr. Peabody, set the way-back machine for September 12, 2013.

Here are Dolly and Trisha enjoying a Cheeto
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Checking out the magnolia tree.
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Squirrel encounters are nothing new around here. Dolly and Mr. Squirrel had an encounter that day.
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How about a gratuitous kittie photo. Here is my Dr Zoidberg cleaning himself.
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That was an eventful day for them. Time to move on. Let's check in on Elphie. Mr. Peabody set the way-back machine for September 16, 2015.

Elphie was the first hen to enter the house on her own. She was being chased by a dog and ran right between my legs when I opened the door to see what the ruckus was. She ran all the way to the living room and then stopped when she realized where she was.
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Earlier that day she was just enjoying herself in the fall sun.
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What a memorable day for her.

Let's drop in on the The Greatest Hen Ever before we wrap up our trip back in time. Set the way-back machine for September 15, 2016.

Not a lot happening this day but the flock did enjoy some leftover spaghetti sauce.
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Let's wrap with another gratuitous kittie photo. Why do large cats want to cram into small boxes?
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That is it for today's journey back. Mr. Peabody please set the way-back machine to take us back home.
I love your kitties! I love Dr. zoidberg too. Great name choice 👍
 

RoyalChick

Crowing
Nov 3, 2019
1,898
19,393
461
Northern New Jersey
My Coop

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