micstrachan

Free Ranging
Premium member
Apr 10, 2016
6,537
14,681
737
Santa Cruz Mountains, California
My grandfather’s cat used to try and take on German Shepard’s, pit bulls, and raccoons. He was incredibly territorial, and one tough little guy. The dog owners usually managed to get their dogs clear of the crazy hissing fluffball charging them without incident. He “won” against the raccoons twice though, and got off with very little damage (he tore an ear pretty decently once). And not those skinny country raccoons, big trash fed city coons! It still amazes me how tiny the ones here are.
Have you seen the video of a cat chasing off a BEAR???
 

RoyalChick

Crowing
Nov 3, 2019
524
5,451
271
Northern New Jersey
My Coop
My Coop
Have you seen the video of a cat chasing off a BEAR???
Yes! My mother had three cats. Well ownership was unclear. They lived where they chose. But my mother’s yard was ‘theirs’. They worked as a pack to deal with visiting dogs. It was quite terrifying to watch them close in on 3 sides and then all go batshit crazy at the same time charging the dog. It was very effective!
 

Shadrach

Roosterist
Jul 31, 2018
12,093
83,262
1,402
Catalonia, Spain
My Coop
My Coop
Sorry about the picture quality, the light was fading.
Tribe 2 at roost time. The thing that I wanted to point out is that the chicks do not get bothered by the roosters and only occasionally get a warning peck from the other hens.
Both roosters will let the chicks eat from the same bowl as they do. That all stops at some point.
P2162528.JPG



Once Punch or Mag has gone in the others will follow.
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Bracket and chicks waiting.
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Lock, the pullet on the left is the most junior and the last allowed in. If she goes in first she'' get kicked out when the seniors go in. This puts her in the tree climbing risk list. She knows it's time to roost but has to wait for a coop place.
P2162533.JPG
 
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