BY Bob

Proprietor, Fluffy Butt Acres
Premium Feather Member
Jan 1, 2016
13,470
110,589
1,417
Hershey, PA
Thanks! I had started in and jumped around and then it got too confusing, so I wanted to get straight with who was who and when. Your "family" stories/posts are sweet, funny, happy and sad, but all the time very honest and immediate. Your writing style is very relatable and I love your videos and pictures. But yes, it will take me a long time to catch up to here, and I may not catch up - the "here" keeps moving ahead....so maybe I'll have to do both!

I would like to tell you that today I read up through the days Patsy was declining and her death and it really moved me 😭 . You gave her as much as anyone could hope to give and I am so sorry for your loss. Thank you for sharing.
You are so very kind to say such nice things. It is a little over a year now and it still hurts a little.

Tell us a little about your flock. We love pictures too.
 

BY Bob

Proprietor, Fluffy Butt Acres
Premium Feather Member
Jan 1, 2016
13,470
110,589
1,417
Hershey, PA
I'm finding that cream legbars live from 5 to 10 years and lay around 200 eggs per year. So while they are not at production hen level they are little "busier" in the egg department. I'm sure this is the leghorn genes in them. Daisy, the greatest hen ever, once laid 360 eggs in as year. That is profuction level laying. They are supposedly healthy and do not typically suffer from reproductuve disease. It seems they bred out the reproduction issues while creating a solid blue egg layer.

As with any chickens, the quality of breeding stock can determine the long term health of any chicken.
 

RoyalChick

Free Ranging
Nov 3, 2019
1,992
20,383
511
Northern New Jersey
My Coop
I'm finding that cream legbars live from 5 to 10 years and lay around 200 eggs per year. So while they are not at production hen level they are little "busier" in the egg department. I'm sure this is the leghorn genes in them. Daisy, the greatest hen ever, once laid 360 eggs in as year. That is profuction level laying. They are supposedly healthy and do not typically suffer from reproductuve disease. It seems they bred out the reproduction issues while creating a solid blue egg layer.

As with any chickens, the quality of breeding stock can determine the long term health of any chicken.
Thank you for figuring that out for me. It makes me feel a bit better about the young ladies at least.
Maggie continues to torment them and continues to demand to be hand fed blueberries in the morning.
 

ChicoryBlue

Chirping
May 8, 2020
81
363
73
You are so very kind to say such nice things. It is a little over a year now and it still hurts a little.

Tell us a little about your flock. We love pictures too.
I don't think anyone ever stops hurting from grief, but you can adjust to living with it. So it becomes part of you, but not the main you, ideally. Here's my flock of 4 Buckeyes, they are coming up on 12 weeks old.

I'm wondering about putting a colored band on their legs to tell them apart; as they've molted they have really changed! I know Butters and Hazel(nut) by sight. And they are the boldest, especially Hazel who is like a sewing machine eating out of your hand ("Mealworms? Make way, pardon me, coming through!"). Butters leads in exploring out and about, but Hazel rules the food area. But I can only tell Popcorn and Peanut apart by Popcorn's voice. She is a little raspy, it happened one evening when they were young, during their bedtime yelling routine. And Peanut is the shyest of them and doesn't cram in for food, she hangs back. She must be lowest in the pecking order. I often use two hands with treats, and stretch one hand out to her in the back, so she gets some. At least until the others discover that second pile....

I am having trouble loading a picture. I will see about it - is 5 megs too big? It keeps stopping and then is crossed out...OK got it!
MG_20200908_175128712.jpg
 
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