ValerieJ

Enabler
Premium member
Jul 24, 2016
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Washington State
I picked Fat Bird up today. She's getting on in years and isn't really up for the rushing about of the youngsters. She used to have Ruffles as company but now if I find she's not with the tribe, I go and look for her. It took about six years before I could pick her up without a fuss. She comes to me now when she hears me coming. Most times I just herd her along which she seems happy with. She just want's a bit of protection when moving across open ground.:love
That is the sweetest vision. I have to shepherd my chickens from time to time. It's nice to be able to make them feel more secure.
 

Kris5902

Crossing the Road
Oct 12, 2018
3,590
18,894
762
British Columbia, Canada
I don't know if she would be upset if she new you called her that or not? :confused:
I’m also not familiar with that turn of phrase... I read it to say she is a stunner, as a compliment, let’s hope she takes it take way as well. Chickens are obviously multi lingual and fluent in all the different human languages we use to praise their magnificence ;) Just like cats!:lol:
 

ValerieJ

Enabler
Premium member
Jul 24, 2016
8,509
50,438
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Washington State
I’m also not familiar with that turn of phrase... I read it to say she is a stunner, as a compliment, let’s hope she takes it take way as well. Chickens are obviously multi lingual and fluent in all the different human languages we use to praise their magnificence ;) Just like cats!:lol:
That's why my chickens are always having big conversations that I can't understand!
 

BY Bob

Proprietor, Fluffy Butt Acres
Premium member
Jan 1, 2016
6,430
46,385
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Hershey, PA
A stop out is someone who stays out instead of coming home - they stop out. Someone who imbibes while others sleep. Shad is using the term with warmth and camaraderie, but it's sometimes used as a mild insult: "he's a dirty stop out these days"
I understood what the phrase meant and I believe it can be both an insult or a compliment, correct? I was trying to display my knowledge of the phrase and the limitations sometimes of the written word and be a little funny.

I believe I failed. It happens. :confused:
 

LozzyR

Free Ranging
Mar 30, 2019
1,429
12,247
507
NSW, Australia
I understood what the phrase meant and I believe it can be both an insult or a compliment, correct? I was trying to display my knowledge of the phrase and the limitations sometimes of the written word and be a little funny.

I believe I failed. It happens. :confused:
Australians have this annoying habit of using insults as terms of endearment. ;)
 

micstrachan

Free Ranging
Premium member
Apr 10, 2016
6,521
14,568
737
Santa Cruz Mountains, California
I picked Fat Bird up today. She's getting on in years and isn't really up for the rushing about of the youngsters. She used to have Ruffles as company but now if I find she's not with the tribe, I go and look for her. It took about six years before I could pick her up without a fuss. She comes to me now when she hears me coming. Most times I just herd her along which she seems happy with. She just want's a bit of protection when moving across open ground.:love
That’s adorable. My flock likes protection when crossing open ground, too. It’s so stinkin’ cute, I can hardly stand it. If I go stand out on the road (really just an easement to a single property beyond ours,) they’ll all run across in single file right beside me. Some will jut their necks and flap, too, while one or two will fly!
 

MaryJanet

Crossing the Road
Premium member
Dec 24, 2018
3,427
26,781
817
Adelaide, South Australia
My Coop
My Coop
I understood what the phrase meant and I believe it can be both an insult or a compliment, correct? I was trying to display my knowledge of the phrase and the limitations sometimes of the written word and be a little funny.

I believe I failed. It happens. :confused:
I understood that you knew what Shad meant. I was explaining for @Kris5902 :) I really need to be less school marmy!
 

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